2012 Election

 
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  Why is Florida always so competitive in national elections?

Jeff Greenfield speaks with Susan MacManus of the University of South Florida about why Florida is always so competitive in national elections.

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American Voices: Jon Meacham on our obligation to the elderly

Jon Meacham discusses our obligations to the elderly, and how his personal experiences with older people have shaped his life.

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Need to Know’s Jeff Greenfield discusses GOP debate on MSNBC’s ‘Morning Joe’

Need to Know host Jeff Greenfield appeared on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on Friday to discuss the Republican presidential debate and the crucial Florida primary next Tuesday.

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The presidential debates are broken. Help us fix them.

Inane questions. Strict time limits. Realty TV fanfare. The presidential debates are broken. Help us fix them. We’re crowd-sourcing your best ideas for how to make the debates better.

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Who is Sheldon Adelson?

Never before in the history of American politics has a single couple given more money to a single candidate and had a bigger impact, writes Robert Reich.

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Voters don’t trust Gingrich on the economy, but he’s still beating Romney. Why?

Gingrich is surging — again — in the GOP race, even though voters trust Romney more on the economy. Why? It might have something to do with his anger.

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  American Voices: Bernard Lafayette on voting rights

Need to Know’s “American Voices” essay features Bernard Lafayette, a prominent civil rights leader from the 1960s who reflects on the struggle for black voting rights then and what he believes are organized efforts to undo them now.

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  Just how conservative is South Carolina?

Host Jeff Greenfield speaks with two of South Carolina’s leading political analysts about the various ideological strains within the state’s Republican Party.

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  Party down: Voting and power in South Carolina

In a report from South Carolina on the eve of the GOP primary there, anchor Jeff Greenfield describes how the sharp rise in the number of black state lawmakers creates the mistaken impression of greater black power.