Culture

 
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Historical vertebrae, a sideshow mummy and the lingering mystery of John Wilkes Booth

Since Abraham Lincoln’s assassination 146 years ago, questions have persisted about John Wilkes Booth’s fate. Historians scoff, but Booth’s descendants want to know more.

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An interview with Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat

Award-winning author and MacArthur Genius Grant winner Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti and came to the U.S. when she was 12. Rafael Pi Roman, our colleague from the WNET program “Sunday Arts,” spoke with Danticat recently.

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  How ‘gesture technology’ like Microsoft Kinect will change the way we live

Modifications to the Microsoft Kinect gaming system enable people to control computers using just their body movements — an innovation that could change the way we live.

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  An actor’s life: Israeli-Palestinian theater advocate murdered

A look at the life and work of Juliano Mer-Khamis, the Israeli Palestinian actor and the director of the Jenin Freedom Theatre recently killed by unknown gunmen. He was a controversial figure who believed that art and theater could be used for social change.

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  An island divided: Haitian immigrants deported from the Dominican Republic

More than a year after the earthquake in Haiti, the Dominican Republic is deporting Haitian refugees en masse, prompting allegations of racism and wrongful treatment by human rights activists.

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  Who would you kill? Test your moral intuitions

An out-of-control train is hurtling down the track toward four trapped hikers. What do you do? Test your moral intuitions in life-or-death situations with this interactive quiz.

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Dan Savage brings his ‘It Gets Better’ message to bookstores

Dan Savage talks to NTK’s Dreux Dougall about his recently released book of essays and stories.

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Countdown to the ‘Feathered Four’

The season isn’t ALL about basketball. Another tournament is quietly heating up, and there is still time to fill out your brackets for the Tweet 16. That’s right: birds.

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Swallowing the whistle: Why we choose to do nothing when the stakes are high

Whether it’s a foul at the end of a basketball game or a an out-of-control train bearing down on four innocent people, human beings often choose to do nothing. Why? Sports Illustrated senior writer Jon Wertheim, author of “Scorecasting,” explains.