Health

 
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For residents and cleanup workers, health risks of Gulf oil spill remain uncertain

A year after the BP spill, cleanup workers are still asking questions about health risks. Can a federal study provide the answers? Need to Know’s medical correspondent reports.

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The battle over Medicare and Medicaid

What would the Republicans’ newly proposed changes to Medicare and Medicaid mean to Americans? With interviews and animation, Need to Know delves into the details.

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  Caring for wounded veterans with traumatic brain injury

Need to Know has been following the story of military families who have given up everything to care for wounded veterans at home. Correspondent Maria Hinojosa revisits the story to find out why they are still waiting for support promised in legislation that President Obama signed last year.

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  Six women, many small steps toward breast cancer breakthroughs

Dr. Emily Senay examines three clinical trials current under way: new chemotherapy tests, freezing breast cancer tumors and scalp cooling to save patients’ hair.

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  Dispelling the myths surrounding cancer trials

Clinical trials are vital to advancing cancer treatment, but sometimes doctors can’t find patients to participate and patients can’t find the trials. “It’s like two ships passing in the night,” says Dr. Elly Cohen.

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  The leaves keep falling

An intimate portrait of two Vietnamese families whose children are severely disabled from exposure to Agent Orange still left in the environment.

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  Atul Gawande: End-of-life counseling improves — and even extends — lives

As health care is attached in Congress and the courts, Dr. Atul Gawande discusses the quiet removal of one controversial provision: funding for end-of-life counseling, the so-called ‘death panels.’

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  Planning for the final months: End-of-life care

As Congress continues to battle over funding for end-of-life counseling, NOW on PBS takes a first-hand look at how doctors help their patients plan for their final months.

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  A new way to diagnose Alzheimer’s offers hope

An FDA advisory panel has recommended approval of a brain scan that may help diagnose Alzheimer’s. Dr. Emily Senay tells us what this test might mean for the future.