Infrastructure

 
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  City for sale: The politics of privatizing infrastructure

As communities across the country struggle to make ends meet, leasing public assets to private investors is an increasingly attractive way to generate much needed cash. Need to Know correspondent Rick Karr travels to two cities that are doing just that.

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No bridge over troubled water: Our economy depends on a functioning transportation system

Can the nation afford $56 billion on highway spending alone? Samuel Schwartz argues that the costs of failing to improve our national infrastructure are the ones we really can’t afford.

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An indecent proposal for our country’s infrastructure future

Is it fiscally responsible to cut transportation spending now when this country’s infrastructure needs are only growing?, asks Samuel I. Schwartz.

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Inkjet printing solar panels: cheap and almost green

Solar energy is one of the easiest and greenest of the renewable energy sources, but its high price is holding it back. One of the most promising new research developments involves printing thinner, cheaper panels with an inkjet.

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To shrink or not to shrink? Your comments on urban renewal

What’s the best course of action for cities with blighted neighborhoods — downsizing or reinventing the unused space? Add your thoughts.

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Brits weigh in on America’s transportation network

The Economist tells it like it is — or isn’t.

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  Building the next America: Ed Rendell makes the case for spending on high-speed rail

Republicans and President Obama are at odds again, this time over the administration’s plan to invest in high-speed rail. Ed Rendell makes the case for spending to improve the nation’s infrastructure.

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Train in vain? Obama’s high-speed rail plan is more ‘I think I can’ than ‘Yes, we can’

Transportation Desk: Despite $8 billion proposed for high-speed rail, Obama’s plan is more ‘I think I can’ than ‘Yes, we can.’

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  Historian Alan Brinkley on a new ‘New Deal’

Jon Meacham talks with historian Alan Brinkley about President Obama’s ambitious government programs and whether a second New Deal is possible or practical in today’s world of political partisanship.