Transcript: November 23, 2012

Need to Know
Episode 263
Airdate: November 23, 2012

ANNOUNCER [narration]: THIS IS NEED TO KNOW WITH … JEFF GREENFIELD… MARIA HINOJOSA…. RAY SUAREZ… AND THIS WEEK SCOTT SIMON.
SCOTT SIMON [narration]: ON THIS SPECIAL JOBS EDITION: HELP WANTED:  THEY ARE UNEMPLOYED, COLLECTING BENEFITS, AND STARTING SMALL BUSINESSES.

PAT SANDERLIN: They were able to start up a business and be self-sufficient. Some of them, you know, already have employees. You know, as bad as this economy is, tho– you know, those people really are my heroes.

SCOTT SIMON [narration]: ALSO, A PLAN THAT USES UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS TO HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB.

KYLE ADAMONIS: In keeping people employed, you have a continuity, right? You have the– ability to ramp up when you need to ramp up. You have people who have been in– on a job for a long time. They know exactly what they’re doing.

SCOTT SIMON [narration]: NEXT ON NEED TO KNOW.

FUNDER BED

SCOTT SIMON: Welcome to this special edition of “Need to Know” – our monthly focus on the jobs crisis that we call “Help Wanted”.  I’m Scott Simon. And thanks for watching. In the two and a half weeks since the presidential election, America’s focus has shifted from jobs and taxes to the Petraeus sex scandal, the conflict in the Middle East, and the negotiations in Washington DC to keep us from falling off the fiscal cliff.

But more than 20 million Americans remain unemployed or underemployed. And the unemployment rate is still stuck at nearly 8 percent. Given that, you’d think government officials would be devising plans to help generate new jobs and to preserve the ones that already exist.

Some states are. One is Oregon. There, losing your job can actually mean gaining the opportunity to start your own business — with the state’s help. The idea is if your new enterprise succeeds, you might be able to employ others who are looking for work. Need to Know’s Karla Murthy first reported on this last year. And this week, she updates her story.

ALEXIS PETERKA: I was working for a small tech startup here in town. It wasn’t, honestly, a very good fit. So when I got laid off, it was a disappointment but it wasn’t necessarily a surprise.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: ALEXIS PETERKA IS An unemployed GRAPHIC DESIGNER IN PORTLAND – ONE OF nearly TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND unemployed people in Oregon. Peterka is eligible to collect $426 dollars a week in unemployment benefits – if she spends her time looking for a new job.

But because of an innovative program in Oregon – she’s not searching the want ads – even though she’s collecting her benefits. Instead, peterka is creating her own job – AN ONLINE SERVICE FOR PEOPLE LOOKING FOR PETSITTERS.

ALEXIS PETERKA: I love my pets but I also love to travel. And the idea that I had was to someway connect dog owners with each other to pet sit for each other. So the way it would work is that if you have a dog and you know that you’re going to be going out of town for five days, you can go on the website, select the days that you’re going to be gone, and then see who all in your area can pet sit for you.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: SHE KNOWS STARTING A BUSINESS takes A LOT OF WORK . SHE TRIED IT TWICE BEFORE, BUT EACH VENTURE FAILED. but SHE’S MORE THAN HAPPY to put in the hours TO TRY IT AGAIN.

ALEXIS PETERKA: Working 80 hours a week for someone else sucks. I don’t have to tell anyone that. Working 80 hours a week to achieve your own dream is not work. It’s just fun.

THE PROGRAM that makes her buiness venture possible is called the SELF EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM AND runs for six months. it’s SMALL and relatively UNKNOWN – and has been OFFERED BY THE STATE since 1995.

ALEXIS PETERKA: The Self-Employment Assistance Program allows me to pay my rent and not have to jump all through these hoops of looking for a job that I don’t really want. And it gives me a six-month cushion where I can just focus on my idea and not have to worry about anything else.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: THE SELF EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM BEGAN UNDER NAFTA BACK IN 1993 TO HELP OFFSET JOB LOSSES. THE LAW ALLOWS STATES TO CREATE A PROGRAM THAT EXEMPTS PEOPLE ON UNEMPLOYMENT FROM THE REQUIREMENT OF LOOKING FOR A JOB. INSTEAD – IT ALLOWS THEM TO WORK FULL TIME ON STARTING A BUSINESS – AND STILL RECEIVE THEIR BENEFITS.

Pat sanderlin HAS WORKED FOR the OREGON EMPLOYMENT DEPARTMENT FOR almost 20 YEARS – AND RUNS THE STATE’S SELF EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM.

pat sanderlin: The majority of these people are highly motivated. They know what they need to do. And we make the money available to them and– and step away. And if they need our help, you know, they come ask us for it. That really works.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: SO FAR in 2012, THERE ARE OVER 600 PARTICIPANTS – JUST A TINY FRACTION OF ALL THE UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE IN OREGON. BUT NO MATTER HOW SMALL THE PROGRAM IS –SANDERLIN SEES IT AS A BRIGHT SPOT.

according To an informal SURVEY, 70% of businesses that began under the program in oregon are still UP AND RUNNING after 6 years – a much higher percentage than the national average for start-ups.

PAT SANDERLIN: Popular opinion or wisdom, whatever the term you want to use is, that 50 percent of all businesses are– are going to fail. And– when we saw we were, you know, we had o– over– over 70 percent people actually getting into business after they went through the program and then to survive in this economy, you start to say, “Something you know, something worked here. You know, some– something went right.”

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: SANDERLIN BELIEVES THAT GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION to create MORE start-up companies COULD BE ONE WAY TO HELP SOLVE THE COUNTRY’S PERVASIVE UNEMPLOYMENT PROBLEM.

one reason the program is so small is that NOT EVERYONE CAN GET in. PARTICIPANTS HAVE TO BE IDENTIFIED BY THE STATE AS LIKELY TO EXHUAST THEIR BENEFITS BEFORE FINDING A STEADY JOB. THEY ALSO HAVE TO SUBMIT A VIABLE BUSINESS PLAN to the oregon small business center or a similar review agency for approval.

SINCE STARTING THE PROGRAM IN JUNE 2011 – ALEXIS PETERKA HAS BEEN WORKING ON HER ONLINE BUSINESS – CALLED STAYHOUND. SHE SPENDS A LOT OF HER TIME LOOKING FOR POTENTIAL CLIENTS. SHE SAYS- THE BEST PLACE FOR THAT IS HER LOCAL DOG PARK.

ALEXIS PETERKA: These are the people who make up the community that I’m trying to build. These are the other pet lovers. And these are the kinds of people who, I think, are going to be less likely to leave their dog at a really impersonal kennel. So that’s why I’m here today, handing out some organic vegetarian free-range dog biscuits– just to sort of get the word out about Stay Hound and build a community.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: UNLIKE ALEXIS PETERKA – GRAHAM GOAD HAS BEEN RUNNING HIS BUSINESS FOR THE LAST SIX YEARS – A REPAIR SHOP FOR SMALL AIRPLANES. HE ENROLLED IN THE STATE RUN PROGRAM AFTER BEING LAID OFF FROM HIS AIRPLANE MECHANIC JOB BACK IN 2005. EVEN THOUGH BUSINESS HAD SLOWED – GOAD SAYS HE STILL WASN’T EXPECTING THE BAD NEWS.

GRAHAM GOAD: The way I was laid of kinda shocked me. Yeah, the owner walked out the door. He was going on vacation and said I might wanna go down to the unemployment office and get my two-week waiting period out of the way. So I was pretty upset.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: AFTER THREE MONTHS ON UNEMPLOYMENT – GOAD WAS ASKED BY HIS OLD BOSS IF HE WANTED TO BUY THE BUSINESS. GOAD APPLIED FOR THE SELF EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM…THEN WENT TO THE BANK AND BORROWED 100,000. IT WAS A BIG risk – but GOAD SAYS, he wasn’t worried.

GRAHAM GOAD: If it failed I’d be unemployed, which is where I was when I started. So, but no, I– I’ve– I was quite confident that I would increase the business that had been lost and– and rebuild it what it– what I thought it could be.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: HE STARTED OUT WORKING IN THIS OLD HANGAR. SIX YEARS LATER – GOAD IS NOW OPERATING OUT OF THIS BRAND NEW BUILDING. HE’S ALSO BEEN ABLE TO HIRE THREE PEOPLE.

THIS BRINGS UP A KEY POINT ABOUT OREGON’S PROGRAM. MANY OF THE people Who got their start thanks to the program – AREN’T JUST WORKING BY THEMSELVES – BUT ARE now EMPLOYING OTHERS TOO.

LIKE THIS CATERING COMPANY THAT CARRIE WONG STARTED BACK IN 2000.

CARRIE WONG: I didn’t think anybody had any high quality desserts. So I started doing my homework. I went to all the better restaurants and said, “What are you serving for dessert.” They’d show me. And they were really open. The chefs were great. And I said, “Here, try this.” And they go, “Oh, my god. Can we get this? And is it affordable in our market?

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: IN HER FIRST YEAR, SHE WAS THE SOLE EMPLOYEE. BUT BY THE SECOND YEAR, SALES HAD DOUBLED. SINCE THEN – SHE’S BEEN ABLE TO KEEP ON 2 FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND HIRE DOZENS OF PARTTIME WORKERS FOR EVENTS.

AND THERE’S THIS TECH COMPANY THAT DEVELOPS APS FOR MOBILE PHONES.

ADAM LOWERY (co-founder, Urban Airship): Things are going far better than I ever anticipated.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: TWO OF THE FOUR CO-FOUNDERS WERE IN THE SELF EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM – AND STARTED THE COMPANY IN 2009. LAST YEAR – THEY HAD 35 EMPLOYEES. PAT SANDERLIN SAYS – IT MAY NOT SEEM LIKE A LOT – BUT THE NUMBERS DO ADD UP. HIS OFFICE ESTIMATED THAT LAST YEAR – BUSINESSES CREATED THROUGH THE PROGRAM WILL PAY OUT 10.5 MILLION DOLLARS IN PAYROLL.

PAT SANDERLIN: If you look at the number of employees and– and– and the amount of payroll, that– that’s just about one small town in Oregon. You know, that’s– that’s significant.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: ACCORDING TO THIS STUDY – START-UPS ACCOUNT FOR AN AVERAGE OF 3 MILLION NEW JOBS ANNUALLY. AND THAT’S NOT ALL – WITHOUT START-UPS, THERE WOULD BE NO NET JOB GROWTH IN THE U.S. ECONOMY. SANDERLIN SAYS – IT’S THE PEOPLE IN HIS PROGRAM THAT ARE PUTTING PEOPLE BACK TO WORK.

PAT SANDERLIN: I’m a person that doesn’t really have a lotta heroes in– in– in my world. But– the people that– that came through this program that were on unemployment and they were able to start up a business and be self sufficient. Some of them, you know, already have employees. You know, as bad as this economy is, tho– you know, those people really are my heroes, so.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: ONE THING TO NOTE IS THAT OREGON’S PROGRAM DOESN’T COST THE STATE AN EXTRA DIME TO RUN.

YET –ONLY a handful of STATES HAVE SIMILAR SELF EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS UP AND RUNNING. SO WHY AREN’T MORE STATES JUMPING ON BOARD?

WELL FOR ONE – EVERY STATE’S LEGISLATURE HAS TO RATIFY THE PROGRAM – AND THERE’S BEEN SOME RESISTANCE. FOR INSTANCE – IN NEW HAMPSHIRE – A BILL TO ESTABLISH A SELF EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM WAS DEFEATED IN 2009. businesses THERE DID NOT WANT PAYROLL TAXES USED TO FUND POTENTIAL COMPETITION. IN OTHER STATES – THERE’S JUST BEEN A LACK OF INTEREST. SEVERAL STATES HAVE PASSED LEGISLATION – BUT NEVER IMPLEMENTED THE PROGRAM.

PAT SANDERLIN THINKS MORE STATES SHOULD TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT OREGON IS DOING. BUT, HE DOES ADMIT THERE ARE SOME LIMITATIONS. reMEMBER – THE PROGRAM ONLY LASTS SIX MONTHS –- NOT A LOT OF TIME TO GET A BUSINESS UP AND RUNNING.

ALEXIS PETERKA: It’s not going to be enough time to become profitable. What it does give me though is it gives me enough time to figure out whether or not it’s going to work I think.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: RECENTLY, WE CHECKED BACK IN WITH ALEXIS PETERKA TO SEE IF HER BUSINESS DID WORK. IN JANUARY – SHE RAN OUT OF MONEY AND DISSOLVED THE COMPANY. SHE REALIZED SHE WAS COMPETEING AGAINST BETTER FUNDED START-UPS OFFERING THE SAME ONLINE PET SERVICE.

ALEXIS PETERKA: Every failure is an opportunity to learn. It’s part of the tradeoff. And it’s part of what makes it fun too. Every time I do this, I learn something new. Every person that I talk to I get a new piece of information, I get a new connection. It’s exciting because it’s learning.

KARLA MURTHY [narration]: AS FOR THE OTHER ENTREPRENEURS WE MET LAST YEAR: GOOD NEWS.

GRAHAM GOAD IS ON TRACK TO HAVING HIS BEST YEAR SINCE 2007. IN FACT, BUSINESS HAS BEEN SO GOOD, HE’S TAKEN HIS FIRST WEEK-LONG VACATION IN 6 YEARS.

AND THE OTHER TWO COMPANIES HAVE SUCCEEDED SO WELL, THEY HAVE CREATED EVEN MORE JOBS.

CARRIE WONG HAS BEEN ABLE TO HIRE ANOTHER FULL TIME EMPLOYEE AND A PERMANENT PART TIME WORKER.

AND URBAN AIRSHIP, THE TECH COMPANY HAS GROWN TO ALMOST 100 EMPLOYEES – TRIPLE FROM LAST YEAR.

ADAM LOWERY (co-founder, Urban Airship): The company will definitely continue to grow. I’m not sure what size we’ll end up, but– we– we’ve got far more work than we can handle.

SCOTT SIMON: Last February, Congress approved a measure to help states fund self-employment programs like Oregon’s. But as you heard in our report, few states have taken advantage of the opportunity. Congress also made it easier for states to create work share programs which are designed to help employers avoid layoffs during down times. Workshare is the focus of our next story. It was first broadcast in the fall of 2011. Need to Know’s Mona Iskander reports from Rhode Island.
MONA ISKANDER [narration]: FRAN ROSATO IS A SUPERVISOR FOR TACO –A RHODE ISLAND COMPANY THAT MAKES HEATING AND COOLING PARTS. TACO’S BEEN AROUND FOR OVER 90 YEARS… BUT LIKE MANY BUSINESSES – IT’S FACED HARD TIMES IN THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN.

FRAN ROSATO: Toward the end of the summer we started to notice the inventories building and– they kept building. And things weren’t going out of the warehouse. Just going in. And we– the writing was on the wall. We knew something was gonna have to happen.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: KYLE ADAMONIS IS ONE OF ROSATO’S SUPERVISORS, AND A SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AT TACO. SHE CALLS EACH OF THE COMPANY’S NEARLY 500 EMPLOYEES AN IMPORTANT ASSET. SO WHEN BUSINESS SLOWED, TACO FACED SOME DIFFICULT CHOICES.

KYLE ADAMONIS: As we took a look at areas that we had that were slow within the production operations group, we said, okay, what– what are our options?

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: ONE OPTION WAS LAYING PEOPLE OFF. BUT ADAMONIS AVOIDED THAT … BECAUSE OF AN EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM OFFERED BY THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND. IT’S CALLED “WORKSHARE”. THE GOAL IS TO KEEP PEOPLE WORKING WHEN COMPANIES FACE FINANCIAL TROUBLE.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS: LET’S SAY A COMPANY NEEDS TO CUT COSTS. INSTEAD OF LAYING ANYONE OFF, THE COMPANY TEMPORARILY CUTS THE WORK SCHEDULE FROM, SAY, 5 DAYS TO 4 – A 20% REDUCTION FOR EVERYONE.

SO A WORKER MAKING ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS A WEEK FOR FIVE DAYS HAS HER WEEKLY SALARY REDUCED BY 20% TO 800 HUNDRED DOLLARS.

HERE’S WHERE RHODE ISLAND’S WORKSHARE PROGRAM STEPS IN. IT USES UNEMPLOYMENT FUNDS TO REIMBURSE THE WORKER A PORTION OF THE LOST WAGES: UP TO $120.

SO IN THIS CASE, THE WORKER ENDS UP TAKING HOME $920 – AND MORE IMPORTANTLY, SHE GETS TO KEEP HER JOB AND BENEFITS.

MONA ISKANDER: You could just eliminate costs by laying people off. Why not take that route?

KYLE ADAMONIS: In keeping people employed, you have a continuity, right? You have the– ability to ramp up when you need to ramp up. You have people who have been in– on a job for a long time. They know exactly what they’re doing. So to have to lay people off and then risk losing people– there’s a cost to that.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: IN FACT, TACO HAS USED WORKSHARE TWICE BEFORE IN THE LAST FEW YEARS. THIS TIME AROUND IN OCTOBER, FRAN ROSATO AND ABOUT 140 EMPLOYEES AT TACO SAW THEIR WORK WEEK REDUCED BY 20%. ROSATO WORKS MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY. FRIDAY, HE COLLECTS UNEMPLOYMENT. IT’S NOT IDEAL… BUT HE THINKS THINGS WILL TURN AROUND.

FRAN ROSATO: There’s not a person in that building who wants to get laid off. I’d like to know more. I’d like to know exactly what’s gonna happen in two months, but– that’s impossible. So– yeah, I’m– I’m cautiously optimistic.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: THE GOAL IS NOT ONLY THAT THE EMPLOYEE AND THE COMPANY BENEFIT FROM THE RHODE ISLAND WORKSHARE PROGRAM. EVEN THE STATE IS A WINNER BECAUSE IT SUFFERS NO NET JOB LOSS.

DEAN BAKER OF THE LIBERAL WASHINGTON THINK TANK, THE CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND POLICY RESEARCH, BELIEVES THE VALUE OF THE PROGRAM IS SOMETHING EVERYONE OUGHT TO BE ABLE TO AGREE ON.

DEAN BAKER: If the government’s prepared to give someone a check every month ’cause they’re not working, why aren’t they willing to give them one-fifth as much because they’re one-fifth unemployed. It just makes common sense. And I’ve talked with a lot of conservatives about it who basically see it exactly the same way.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: WORK SHARING PROGRAMS ARE ON THE BOOKS IN 22 OTHER STATES. BUT BAKER SAYS THEY’RE UNDERUTILIZED AND HE WANTS A BROAD FEDERAL INITIATIVE TO PROMOTE THEM.

RHODE ISLAND HAS AGRESSIVELY PROMOTED ITS PROGRAM. STATE OFFICIALS SAY WORK SHARE HELPED PREVENT OVER 16,000 LAYOFFS SINCE 2007.

STILL, RHODE ISLAND’S UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 10.5% – HIGHER THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE. BUT OFFICIALS SAY IT WOULD HAVE BEEN EVEN HIGHER WITHOUT THE WORKSHARE PLAN.

BUT HOW MUCH, REALLY, CAN A PROGRAM LIKE THIS BE EXPECTED TO ACCOMPLISH?

MONA ISKANDER: This isn’t the type of program that’s going to create jobs. Is this just a short-term fix?

DEAN BAKER: Well, what we– in principle, what we need is a short-term fix in a sense that we don’t envision we’re going to have nine percent unemployment indefinitely. It’s a fix that could get us through the recession.

MONA ISKANDER:  Well what about if an employer says oh here’s a great program where I could get my workers to work harder for less amount of time, less money.  And let the government pick up the rest?

DEAN BAKER: There’s always that risk.  You know, obviously, if an employer thinks that they can get their workers to work ten percent– harder, you know, they’ll try to get them to do it, you know, unless they’re worried they’re all going to quit.  So there’s always that tension.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: BUT BAKER SAYS THAT IF IMPLEMENTED CORRECTLY, WORK SHARING CAN REVERSE THE TREND OF HIGH UNMPLOYMENT. HE SAYS – JUST TAKE A LOOK AT GERMANY. WORK SHARING WAS AMONG THE TOOLS IT USED TO MINIMIZE JOB LOSSES DURING THE DOWNTURN. IN FACT, GERMANY’S UNEMPLOYMENT RATE DROPPED FROM 8 PERCENT IN THE SUMMER OF 2009 TO 5.9 PERCENT BY AUGUST 2011.

WE SPOKE TO LABOR ECONOMIST ALEXANDER HERZOG STEIN IN HIS OFFICE IN DUSSELDORF.

ALEXANDER HERZOG-STEIN: Unemployment, as a consequence of a crisis, is not an individual problem, it’s a problem for society. And therefore, society has to work together to overcome this problem, to solve it.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: THE GERMANS WORK SHARING PROGRAM IS SIMILAR TO RHODE ISLANDS THOUGH IT GOES BY A DIFFERENT NAME. THE “SHORT TIME WORK” PROGRAM. AND IN GERMANY IT’S PLAYED OUT ON A NATIONAL SCALE. WHEN THE ECONOMIC CRISIS HIT IN 2008, THE GOVERNMENT REACTED QUICKLY.

ALEXANDER HERZOG-STEIN: The government was very proactive in– in making– publicly– aware that it is a good thing to use Short Time Work, to be a good employer, to save employment.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: SOME 1.5 MILLION GERMANS HAVE TAKEN PART IN THE PROGRAM DURING THE CRISIS, ABOUT THREE AND A HALF PERCENT OF THE TOTAL LABOR FORCE.

ALEXANDER HERZOG-STEIN: Not long ago, some people were talking about– German economy, and especially the German labor market, as the sick man of Europe. And then suddenly– some people talk about the German job miracle. By saving employment during the downturn, when the economy was growing again, Germany companies were well equipped to produce the goods necessary to fulfill this demand and that’s also part of this quick recovery.

MONA ISKANDER: Germany used this program at the beginning of the crisis in. Are we at a place where it’s too late?

DEAN BAKER: Well it certainly would’ve been best if we had this in place back in the fall of ‘08 if we could’ve gone to the– the employers who were laying off people in very large numbers and say hey, why– why don’t you keep people on, have them work 20 percent fewer hours. We lost that opportunity. But we will still benefit a great deal if we have the program in place today.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: BACK IN RHODE ISLAND, TACO EMPLOYEES JUST ENTERED THEIR SECOND MONTH OF WORK SHARE. THE COMPANY HOPES TO RETURN TO REGULAR HOURS BY DECEMBER. BUT FRAN ROSATO IS TAKING PRECAUTIONS IN CASE THE REDUCED HOURS CONTINUE.

FRAN ROSATO: I’ve decided I better start making some plans– financially. So I’ve got experience– in substitute teaching so I’m in the process of renewing my license to substitute teach.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: AND IS HE CONCERNED ABOUT… BEING LAID OFF?

FRAN ROSATO: That was not in my mind when I first got there. Now it’s in the back of my mind. You know, if things were to get worse.

MONA ISKANDER [narration]: SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT KYLE ADAMONIS HOPES THAT DAY WILL NEVER COME … THAT BY TEMPORARILY SCALING DOWN PRODUCTION AND REDUCING HOURS, TACO WILL BE ABLE TO REMAIN LOYAL TO ITS WORKFORCE.

KYLE ADAMONIS: We have a great group of employees. Why would we want to lose them? This is about keeping people employed in the United States. This is about manufacturing in the United States. And so, for us, this is– this is our business. This is why we’re here, right? It’s produce a product, but it’s also to employ people. And so, for us, it’s– we have a sense of responsibility.

SCOTT SIMON: Since we aired our story from Rhode Island – New Jersey and Michigan have passed similar work-sharing legislation. We also checked back with Kyle Adomonis from Taco manufacturing. She told us the company was not able to meet its goal to get everyone back on full time employment by last December. But as of this September, all the company’s employees have had their lost time restored – including Fran Rosato. And Taco has actually hired an additional 10 workers.

SCOTT SIMON [narration]: THIS WEEK ONLINE… PARTICIPATE IN OUR WEEKLY POLL. THE TOPIC:  JOBLESSNESS IN AMERICA. ALSO ONLINE, A CRITICAL, HISTORICAL, CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF…THANKSGIVING TURKEY.  VISIT PBS.ORG/NEED TO KNOW.

SCOTT SIMON: That’s it for this edition of Need to Know.  Here’s a look at what’s coming up on next week’s program.
HUMBERTO NAVARRETE: He’s not resisting. Why are you guys using excessive force on him?

JOHN LARSON: As you arrived there, what was the very first thing you heard?

HUMBERTO NAVARRETE: I heard Anastacio screaming and asking for help.

ASHLEY YOUNG: He was being tased for several seconds and wasn’t moving.

MALE VOICE: Ah! Por favor!

ASHLEY YOUNG: I think I witnessed someone being murdered.

SCOTT SIMON: John Larson will be with you then. We hope you are enjoying the Thanksgiving holiday.  I’m Scott Simon, thanks for watching.

 
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