Need to Know, November 26, 2010

On this special Thanksgiving edition of Need to Know, we bring you some of our best coverage on soldiers fighting in Afghanistan and the ongoing troubles they face even after they return home.

Watch the individual segments:

20 Kilometers a Year

A dramatic video report on U.S. soldiers in the front lines of battle in Afghanistan from Sean Smith, a reporter with the UK’s Guardian newspaper. (Originally aired September 17, 2010)

Uniform Justice

“Veterans’ courts” are being set up around the country to help veterans suffering from untreated Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) who are landing in the criminal justice system. But are these courts giving special treatment to veterans?  Correspondent Maria Hinojosa reports. (Originally aired July 9, 2010)

Six-Word Memoirs

In cooperation with SMITH magazine, Need to Know features the stories of veterans coming home from Afghanistan and Iraq, who told their stories in just six words. (Originally aired November 5, 2010)

Evan Thomas

Alison Stewart speaks with Newsweek’s editor-at-large, Evan Thomas on his book “The War Lovers,” which draws parallels between the Spanish-American War and the Second Gulf War. (Originally aired July 23, 2010)

Outside the Wire

Need to Know profiles two young enlisted women in the U.S. Air Force who serve a crucial, and dangerous, role in the current wars: disarming roadside bombs which have become the number one killer of American troops. Amber Hanlon and Marie Martinson, two among approximately 140 military women doing the same job performed by the soldiers in “The Hurt Locker,” tell what it’s like to be a woman on the front lines. (Originally aired July 9, 2010)

Just Ask Peter Sagal

In this special Thanksgiving edition of Just Ask, Peter Sagal shares some tips on how to survive a holiday family gathering.
 

Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=650328082 Kathryn Sharpe

    Excellent documentary on women in the military.

  • OnTheRoad2Meaning

    This is tremendous insight that I need to at least understand what my 25 year old son is about to go through. He arrived in Afghanistan last week, fresh out of boot camp and just two months in Germany and now begins his service as an Army Engineer. I do not know if I really want to see what my son is starting to go through, but it is my duty to know all I can.