• thumb01-jeanvanier-interview

    Read more of Judy Valente’s May 4, 2006 interview in Chicago with Jean Vanier, founder of L’Arche, a worldwide network of communities for the mentally disabled. More

    May 26, 2006 | Comments

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    While many diplomats have traditionally held a very secular outlook on their work, Albright argues that decision makers need to do a better job of understanding religion’s role in the world. More

    May 19, 2006 | Comments

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    Read more of Kim Lawton's interview with Madeleine Albright about religion and foreign policy.

    May 19, 2006 | Comments

  • madeleinealbrightbookth

    Read excerpts from Madeleine Albright's Book: The Mighty and the Almighty's

    May 19, 2006 | Comments

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    Tony Lazzara was a successful doctor living a comfortable life in the United States, but he left it all behind so he could follow the example of St. Francis of Assisi and help poor, handicapped children in Peru. More

    May 19, 2006 | Comments

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    There's been a growing wave of religious controversy since Dan Brown's novel, THE DA VINCI CODE, was first released in 2003. Many Christians were deeply offended by the story's portrayal of Jesus, Christian doctrine and church history. Now, the highly anticipated movie version is intensifying those debates.

    May 12, 2006 | Comments

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    Read more of Bob Abernethy's April 5, 2006 interview with writer and preacher Frederick Buechner.

    May 5, 2006 | Comments

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    Frederick Buechner is an ordained Presbyterian minister, but has never pastored a church and rarely attends one. His ministry is his writing: 32 novels and memoirs so far, and some sermons, as a guest preacher, many of which are in a new book, SECRETS IN THE DARK. For many Christians he's a celebrity, but Buechner feels that seeking ordination is the worst possible career move for a writer.

    May 5, 2006 | Comments

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    In Myanmar, which many still call Burma, military rulers allow no democracy or free speech and persecute religious minority groups. Human rights groups say there is a campaign of oppression that has resulted in almost a million and a half displaced people. Critics say the generals who control the area are conducting a form of ethnic cleansing hidden from the eyes of the outside world. More

    April 21, 2006 | Comments

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    Read Faith and Doubt After Easter by David E. Anderson.

    April 21, 2006 | Comments