Tag: Alabama

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    Religious leaders have joined civil rights activists, the Justice Department, and others in challenging Alabama’s tough new immigration law. “The government is trying to tell us what we can or can’t do in terms of works of mercy, works of charity, which are fundamental to our faith,” says Father Tom Ackerman of the Catholic Diocese of Birmingham. More

    September 23, 2011 | Comments

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    “It’s a matter of sharing the burdens of a free society and a good society. That’s, morally speaking, what taxes are about,” according to political philosopher and Harvard government professor Michael Sandel. More

    August 5, 2011 | Comments

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    During the Montgomery bus boycott “it was black Christians teaching white Christians what it mean to be Christian,” says a white Lutheran pastor who joined with Martin Luther King Jr. and others to change the world. More

    January 14, 2011 | Comments

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    Watch much more of our conversation with Rev. Robert Graetz, who calls the Montgomery bus boycott a spiritual movement based on love and nonviolence that changed the hearts of people across the country. More

    January 14, 2011 | Comments

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    Every year, close to the anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and that of "Black Sunday" -- the day in 1965 when state troopers attacked protesters marching from Selma to Montgomery -- the nonpartisan Faith and Politics Institute in Washington organizes a trip to Alabama. The trip's purpose is to remind members of Congress what the civil rights movement was all about.

    April 4, 2003 | Comments

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    Read more of R&E correspondent Judy Valente’s interview with Dr. Roseanne Cook about her medical practice in rural Alabama. More

    November 8, 2002 | Comments

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    Health care in the United States is a big problem for the poor — not only because they often can’t afford it. Sometimes it just isn’t there. This is especially true in rural areas, which have a hard time attracting doctors. In rural Alabama, a Catholic nun has found a calling as a doctor, one of only three serving 14,000 people. More

    November 8, 2002 | Comments