Tag: Anglican Communion

  • U.S. Episcopal bishops this week pledged to seek unity within their deeply divided denomination. Tensions have run high since the 2003 consecration of Gene Robinson, the Anglican Communion’s first openly gay bishop. More

    October 1, 2004 | Comments

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    Read more of Deryl Davis’s interview about Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams with the Rev. David L. Moyer, president of Forward in Faith, North America. More

    February 21, 2003 | Comments

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    Read more of Deryl Davis’s interview about Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams with University of Virginia religion professor John Milbank. More

    February 21, 2003 | Comments

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    Read more of Deryl Davis’s interview about Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams with Bishop Frank Griswold. More

    February 21, 2003 | Comments

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    Sometimes-controversial Archbishop Rowan Williams took over in December 2002 as head of the more than 70 million-member worldwide Anglican Communion. Williams will be formally enthroned as Archbishop of Canterbury in February 2003. More

    February 21, 2003 | Comments

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    Queen Elizabeth II, the official head of the Anglican Church, appointed Welsh archbishop Rowan Williams to become the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury. Williams is a noted theologian and writer whose critical views on the war in Afghanistan and support for female bishops and homosexual priests have already generated headlines. More

    July 26, 2002 | Comments

  • Read an evening prayer specially written by Rowan Williams, forthcoming in September in FAMILY PRAYERS by Nick Aiken and Rowan Williams. More

    July 26, 2002 | Comments

  • Read additional comments on the appointment of Rowan Williams as the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury. More

    July 26, 2002 | Comments

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    R & E talks with Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. George Carey about interfaith communication and conversion — particularly, whether Christians should take it upon themselves to attempt to convert Jews. More

    April 27, 2001 | Comments

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    South Africa's retired Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his nonviolent opposition to apartheid. He remains a charismatic leader and South Africa's premier symbol of moral authority. Tutu later chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the official body that brought to light the atrocities of apartheid on both sides, hoping truth would heal bitterness.

    October 16, 1998 | Comments

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