Tag: capital punishment

  • Conversation-death-penalty-FEAT

    “The country‚Äôs long been divided over whether to have it. But that only led to even more difficult questions. How do you do it? How do you implement it? And can you do it fairly and rationally?” More

    May 9, 2014 | Comments

  • webexclusive

    In a recession economy, will money trump moral arguments as state legislatures continue considering repeal of the death penalty?

    April 24, 2009 | Comments

  • re_thumb_cover_molester

    Right now, 36 states permit capital punishment for murder. Should that penalty be extended to those who rape children? More

    June 13, 2008 | Comments

  • supremecourtpreview-thumb

    RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY previews upcoming U.S Supreme Court cases. At issue are recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools, state funding for religious education, and the case of Death Row inmate Delma Banks. More

    October 3, 2003 | Comments

  • 08-2002

    BOB ABERNETHY, anchor: As the U.S. continues to debate the rightness or wrongness of capital punishment, we look at two aspects of the issue. Next week, Huntsville, Texas — where the state prison system carries out more executions than any … More

    May 9, 2003 | Comments

  • 02-2001

    The debate about the death penalty has been revived by the actions of Illinois' outgoing Republican governor George Ryan, who pardoned four death row inmates and commuted the death sentences of all 167 others. Ryan called the capital punishment system "immoral." Watch our discussion with Steve Mills, who has been covering the Illinois story for the Chicago Tribune.

    January 17, 2003 | Comments

  • 06-2002

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is generating controversy on another issue. Scalia criticized the Roman Catholic Church's stand against the death penalty. At a forum on religion and the death penalty, Scalia said he does not agree with the Church's position on capital punishment.

    February 1, 2002 | Comments

  • 07-2003

    When may a lawyer reveal what a client tells him in confidence? The American Bar Association recently made the rule less restrictive. It permits, but does not require, lawyers to disclose confidences to prevent "reasonably certain death or substantial bodily harm." Attorneys who obey the confidentiality rule sometimes do so at the expense of innocent people.

    July 27, 2001 | Comments