Tag: Internet

  • data-collection-featured

    Watch our conversation with Michael Kessler of Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs about perspectives of religious and ethical traditions on the government’s massive collection of electronic data and its vast surveillance effort. More

    June 14, 2013 | Comments

  • thumb01-twitter-outreach

    Once the social network discovered the popularity of religious leaders on Twitter, the company actively began working with religious communities.

    April 8, 2013 | Comments

  • thumb01-socialmedia

    In the brave new world of social media, says communication professor Stephen O’Leary, church authorities from pastors to the heads of denominations “no longer have the kind of control they once did.” More

    March 9, 2012 | Comments

  • thumb-gossip

    At Manhattan High School for Girls, students are learning what Jewish law teaches about gossip, rumors, and evil speech. More

    December 3, 2010 | Comments

  • thumb01-ethicalchildren

    Author and consultant Rushworth Kidder says there can be unintended ethical consequences when people use powerful new social media. More

    November 19, 2010 | Comments

  • dna-genetic-fingerprinting-on-fingerprint-blue-backdrop-1-ajhd1

    Is the promise of direct-to-consumer genetic testing being oversold? What ethical and public policy concerns does selling genetic tests directly to the public raise? More

    June 11, 2010 | Comments

  • thumb011

    “Spirituality has always had a virtual aspect to it,” says anthropology professor Tom Boellsdorff. “People in Second Life can pray and do all kinds of things and find it completely spiritually fulfilling.” More

    September 18, 2009 | Comments

  • imth

    "You can’t say that religious opinions made over 1, 000 years ago are valid for all times," says Gamal al-Banna, a reformist Muslim cleric in Egypt. "We must have a revolution in the understanding of Islam, a revolution almost like Martin Luther’s."

    August 7, 2009 | Comments

  • 0108-06-200

    Alarmed by the proliferation of hate Web sites available on the Internet, the Anti-Defamation League sponsored a symposium in Washington, D.C. to address the concern. Joined by representatives of America Online, the ADL called for new warnings and guidelines for online content. However, controlling the content on the internet and, who views it, without violating individual rights is a hard task.

    October 24, 1997 | Comments