Tag: Judaism

  • feat-converting-to-judaism-800

    “For Judaism to survive in the 21st century and beyond, it needs to be broad, and to not accept converts in the most inclusive way possible challenges that breadth and potentially narrows who we are,” says Shmuly Yanklowitz, an Orthodox rabbi and himself a convert to Judaism. More

    May 1, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-rabbi-sacks-science-800

    “Religion and science are two quite different things and we need them both. Science takes things apart to see how they work. Religion puts things together to see what they mean.” More

    February 20, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-rabbi-sacks-extended-800

    “We have to go back to the 17th century and ask what healed all that harm? And of course the simple answer is that what wins wars is weapons but what wins peace is ideas.” More

    February 13, 2015 | Comments

  • Darren-Aronofsky-FEAT

    “To treat [Noah’s Ark] as something that’s not poetic and mythical is a mistake….we have goodness and wickedness inside of us, and we have a second chance now to take care of creation and each other. That’s a beautiful, poetic, inspiring idea to learn from and to inspire us to do better.” More

    April 3, 2014 | Comments

  • Schama-Extended-FEAT

    “We are a very noisy, verbalizing, speechifying language animal, and I love that. But we walk around as so many millions of talking books.” More

    March 21, 2014 | Comments

  • sholem-aleichem-featured-img

    Sholem Aleichem is a writer best known for the stories that inspired the musical “Fiddler on the Roof.” He wrote in Yiddish, the everyday language of Eastern European Jews, and he wrote about everyday Jewish life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. More

    February 20, 2009 | Comments

  • feat-leonard-nimoy-800

    Leonard Nimoy, the actor who played Spock in the original Star Trek television series, has a controversial new book called Shekhina, a photographic exploration of the presence of God. He says he was deeply influenced by the Jewish mystical tradition of Kabbalah where the Shekhina, or the presence of God, took on a feminine form. More

    December 13, 2002 | Comments