Tag: Rwanda

  • Rohingya-Muslims-FEAT

    “There’s a fear among large segments of the Buddhist population in Myanmar,” says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, an independent organization to protect and defend human rights, “that the country is at risk of being taken over by Muslims. It’s a very unreasonable, irrational fear.” Originally broadcast April 18, 2014 More

    August 15, 2014 | Comments

  • Rwanda20-FEAT2

    (Photo: AP) “When I first saw him, I was so traumatized I had to be taken to the hospital for 10 days,” says Alice Mukarurinda, recalling her first encounter with Emmanuel Ndayisaba at a reconciliation group. He nearly killed her during the genocide. “I managed to forgive him. I believe it was God’s power.” More

    May 16, 2014 | Comments

  • Rohingya-Muslims-FEAT

    “There’s a fear among large segments of the Buddhist population in Myanmar,” says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, an independent organization to protect and defend human rights, “that the country is at risk of being taken over by Muslims. It’s a very unreasonable, irrational fear.” More

    April 18, 2014 | Comments

  • thumb01-dallaire

    Watch excerpts from our recent interview with the author of “Shake Hands with the Devil: The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda” and “They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children: The Global Quest to Eradicate the Use of Child Soldiers.” More

    June 7, 2011 | Comments

  • thumb01-militaryinterventio

    A Yale Law School professor considers what force should be used for in a just world and says intervening militarily to protect people being slaughtered by their own government is “an enormous break with America’s practice.” More

    April 15, 2011 | Comments

  • thumb01-stephencarter

    In a new book called “The Violence of Peace: America’s Wars in the Age of Obama,” Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter ponders the vocabulary of just and unjust war and the significance of using the American military for humanitarian interventions. More

    April 15, 2011 | Comments

  • thumb01-libya

    The UN has demanded a cease-fire and authorized military action. What moral considerations underlie international interventon? More

    March 18, 2011 | Comments

  • thumb01-shauncaseylibya

    “Whether you act or whether you don’t act, the stakes are really quite high, and that’s what makes it so daunting from a moral perspective.” More

    March 18, 2011 | Comments

  • bishoprucyahana

    For 100 days in 1994, Rwandans killed each other at a rate of 10,000 a day. Today the country tries to heal its wounds and deal with the consequences of the slaughter. "We have a nation to build," says Anglican Bishop John Rucyahana. "We cannot wait until we forget the genocide."

    April 17, 2009 | Comments

  • rwanda-featured-2

    In Rwanda, tribal violence and genocide broke out on an almost unimaginable scale. Eight hundred thousand people were killed in little more than three months. Now, as the country recovers, churches are experiencing dramatic growth in the Hutu and Tutsi efforts to find reconciliation. More

    June 9, 2000 | Comments