Tag: social issues

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    We talk with Cheri Harder, president of the Trinity Forum and a former congressional policy advisor and White House staffer, as Republican presidential campaigns get under way. More

    June 3, 2011 | Comments

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    Watch more of our conversation with Cherie Harder about religion and politics in 2012. More

    June 3, 2011 | Comments

  • thumb01-christianright

    The Republican victories this week were also a victory for the Christian right, says this history professor. More

    November 5, 2010 | Comments

  • thumb01-teaparty

    “I would say to the evangelicals who have joined this movement be careful, you will be used,” says Rev. Richard Cizik of the New Evangelical Partnership. “I want a society and a government and its policies to reflect values I find in Scripture, but that’s not what you hear from Tea Party leadership.” More

    October 8, 2010 | Comments

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    “There is some new energy for religious conservatives that’s growing out of the Tea Party,” says George Mason University political scientist Mark Rozell, who calls the relationship between the two groups “mutually reinforcing, even though they are not necessarily all the same people.” More

    October 8, 2010 | Comments

  • thumb-priestandpeople

    “The church has to open itself to hear the wisdom of its laity” says Rev. Patrick Lee, who leads two Catholic parishes in Chicago. More

    May 7, 2010 | Comments

  • johnpodesta-extended-thumb

    Read more of R & E’s interview about Catholic voters with John Podesta of the Center for American Progress. More

    October 8, 2004 | Comments

  • markrozell-extended-thumb

    Read the full R & E interview about Catholic voters with Mark Rozell, professor of public policy at George Mason University. More

    October 8, 2004 | Comments

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    With religion a significant factor in how people vote, we begin this week a three-part series on religious voting blocs. Today, one of the most important of those blocs: Catholic voters. Once loyal to the Democratic Party, Catholics are now as divided as the rest of the nation. More

    October 8, 2004 | Comments