Topic: War and Peace

  • thumbnail-legacy

    Since 1918, every Christmas Eve in England hundreds of people wait for hours in cold temperatures outside King’s College Chapel at the University of Cambridge for a coveted seat at the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols. The millions of listeners around the world who tune in via short wave, FM and the Internet, unable to reach Cambridge’s 16th-century vaulted church or unwilling to risk frostbite, can now follow the annual radio broadcast with a new, illustrated book detailing the service. More

    December 24, 2004 | Comments

  • feat-shadow-of-torture-800

    “The administration has either declared that — as in the case of the Gonzales memo — international law is “obsolete” or “quaint” and therefore does not apply to it or, in the case of the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal, where even the administration acknowledges international law does apply, that it was “a few bad apples” who were responsible for the abuse.” More

    December 3, 2004 | Comments

  • reconciliation-greensboro-featured-img

    Twenty-five years ago, in Greensboro, North Carolina, there was a shooting that left five people dead and the city polarized. Recently, a group of volunteers formed what they call a Truth and Community Reconciliation Project. The idea is to try to find out what happened that day and to create some forgiveness and healing. More

    November 5, 2004 | Comments

  • Father Greg Boyle is giving former gang members a chance at a better future. More

    September 10, 2004 | Comments

  • 08-200

    The arsenal of technology being used to fight crime has grown dramatically. One of the most powerful weapons is DNA evidence, which law enforcement officials can use to solve crimes that are years old. As DNA testing becomes more widespread, serious ethical questions are being raised about how it's used, and whether it violates civil rights. Lucky Severson reports.

    May 28, 2004

  • faith-politics-thumb

    Listen to perspectives about the president’s sense of mission from Richard Cizik, vice president of the National Association of Evangelicals, and Robert Franklin, professor of social ethics at Emory University in Atlanta. More

    April 23, 2004 | Comments

  • 0715-11-200

    In response to multiple attacks on foreigners, the UN, the Red Cross, Oxfam, and Care International have pulled their staffs out of Iraq. Yet other humanitarian aid workers remain, risking their lives to help the needy. Their work is difficult, not only because of the violence, but because many Iraqis are suspicious of them, wondering whether aid workers are really occupiers.

    December 12, 2003 | Comments

  • holocaust-survivors-reunion-featured

    The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington celebrated its 10th anniversary with a tribute to survivors of the Nazi persecution of the Jews. They honored the survivors, their families, and those who rescued them at the end of World War II. More

    November 7, 2003 | Comments

  • 17-200

    The story of a group of American soldiers, all conscientious objectors and Seventh Day Adventists, who volunteered to expose themselves to deadly viruses and bacteria, rather than go to war. Over a 20-year period, beginning in the 1950s, the army used them to test vaccines against biological weapons. Most of them recall the experience without regret.

    October 24, 2003 | Comments

  • israel-crisis-featured-img

    After the 1967 war between Israel and the Arab states around it, the internationally approved “Green Line” defined the border between Israel and the Palestinian Arab territories. Now, the Israelis want to wall themselves off from the Palestinians. But in … More

    September 26, 2003 | Comments

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