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The Six Wives of Henry VIII
Catherine of Aragon Anne Boleyn Jane Seymour Anne of Cleves Catherine Howard Catherine Parr
Meet the Wives Find a Wife Portrait of a King Tudor Times
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arried to King Henry at the age of 31, Catherine Parr was not considered a likely candidate for motherhood, by Tudor standards. But she was a prime pick for stepmother.

Elizabeth, overlooked by earlier wives except for Anne of Cleves, forged a close bond with Catherine through their joint love of learning. At 11, Elizabeth translated Catherine's own best-selling "Prayers and Meditations" into French, Italian and Latin as a present for her father and stepmother. The new queen was


given direct responsibility for her welfare a year later.

Elizabeth's 27-year-old half-sister, Mary, joined Catherine's household from the beginning, acting as a faithful friend and companion. Nine-year-old Edward took a steady interest in his step-mother's attempts to improve her Latin and commended her efforts. She was to him "very dearest mother." (He also was not above begging her to keep the Catholic Mary "from all the wiles and enchantments of the evil one. . .")

But Catherine would not live long enough to care for her own child, Mary.

MARY SEYMOUR (1548 - ?)
Born to the queen and her fourth husband, Thomas Seymour. Mary Seymour would be named for Henry VIII's elder daughter. Rich tapestries and other items were set aside for this baby at the Seymour residence at Sudeley Castle, but several

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Intro Background Why choose this wife? Role as queen King vs. queen Love Life Children Ultimate fate