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Slavery and the Making of AmericaPhoto of a slave family on a plantation in Georgia
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Letter from Sargry Brown to her husband
Dated October 27, 1840
Cited in John W. Blassingame, ed. SLAVE TESTIMONY: TWO CENTURIES OF LETTERS, SPEECHES, INTERVIEWS, AND AUTOBIOGRAPHIES (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1977).

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Document Description
The NATIONAL ANTI-SLAVERY STANDARD published this letter, which it claimed was copied exactly, with no more than a few punctuation edits, from the dead letter office in Washington, D.C. As was often the case, the letter's sender, Sargry Brown, and its recipient, her husband, were enslaved by different masters and lived apart. Sargry informed her husband that she is likely to be sold away, implying that her new location will make future contact between them impossible. For abolitionists, a story like the one told by this letter, was evidence that the inhumane institution of slavery must end.

Transcript
Richmond, VA October 27 1840

Dear Husband-
This is the third letter that I have written to you, and have not received any from you; and don't know the reason that I have not received any from you. I think very hard of it. The trader has been here three times to Look at me. I wish that you would try to see if you can get any one to buy me up there. If you don't come down here this Sunday, perhaps you wont see me any more. Give my love to them all, and tell them all that perhaps I shan't see you any more. Give my love to your mother in particular, and to mamy wines, and to aunt betsy, and all the children; tell Jane and Mother they must come down a fortnight before Christmas. I wish to see you all, but I expect I never shall see you all-never no more.

I remain your Dear and affectionate Wife,
Sargry Brown
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