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Slavery and the Making of America
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SLAVES IN THE FAMILY by Edward Ball (Ballantine Books, 1998)
This National Book Award Winning text follows the author as he attempts to uncover the Ball family's slave-holding past and locate the relatives of his family's former slaves.

SLAVES WITHOUT MASTERS: THE FREE NEGRO IN THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH by Ira Berlin (New Press, 1992)
This acclaimed study details the challenges free blacks faced as they worked to build community, attain liberty, and acquire the means necessary to become fully independent.

EXCHANGING OUR COUNTRY MARKS: THE TRANSFORMATION OF AFRICAN IDENTITIES IN THE COLONIAL AND ANTEBELLUM SOUTH by Michael Gomez (University of North Carolina Press, 1998)
This book examines the intersection of African cultures in America that slavery produced. The author proposes that, over time, the diversity of African ethnicities in America melded into a common race identity.

ROOT AND BRANCH: AFRICAN AMERICANS IN NEW YORK AND EAST JERSEY 1613-1863 by Graham Russell Hodges (University of North Carolina Press, 1999)
This comprehensive history of slavery in two Northern regions begins with the lives of the first free black settlers, traces the development of slavery in the North, and ends with emancipation. The text addresses topics including freedom, servitude, work, and resistance, with a focus on religion and culture.

IN HOPE OF LIBERTY: CULTURE, COMMUNITY AND PROTEST AMONG NORTHERN FREE BLACKS, 1700-1860 by James Oliver Horton and Lois E. Horton (Oxford University Press, 1997)
This book addresses the idea of a distinct community among free blacks in the North, that community's dual identification with Africa and America, and the shifting tactics they used not only in their own struggle for survival and equality, but also in their fight to bring freedom to all slaves in America.

AMERICAN SLAVERY 1619-1877 by Peter Kolchin (Hill and Wang Press, 1993)
This indispensable introduction to the history of slavery in America is an extremely accessible read that offers new insights as well as a thorough synthesis of past scholarship on the subject.

AMERICAN SLAVERY, AMERICAN FREEDOM: THE ORDEAL OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA by Edmund S. Morgan (W.W. Norton Press, 1975)
This book explores the paradoxical fact that slaveholding had a stronghold in the very same country known as the birthplace of democracy and freedom.

SLAVE COUNTER-POINT: BLACK CULTURE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY CHESAPEAKE AND LOWCOUNTRY by Philip D. Morgan (University of North Carolina Press, 1998)
This text explores the effects that slavery had on transforming both African and European culture.



The cover of SLAVERY AND THE MAKING OF AMERICA, the companion book to this television series
SLAVERY AND THE MAKING OF AMERICA by James Oliver Horton and Lois E. Horton (Oxford University Press, 2004)

This text serves as a companion volume to the PBS series "Slavery and the Making of America." The text is a richly illustrated, vividly written history of slavery in America, illuminating the human side of this inhumane institution by presenting it largely through stories of the slaves themselves. Readers will discover a wide ranging and sharp look at American slavery, from the first Africans brought to British colonies in the early seventeenth century to the end of Reconstruction.



SLAVERY AND THE AMERICAN WEST: THE ECLIPSE OF MANIFEST DESTINY AND THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR by Michael A. Morrison (University of North Carolina Press, 1997)
This text examines the shift in American politics due to a partisan divide over slavery. The author argues that conflicting interpretations of republicanism were at the heart of the debate over slavery in the American West.

BLACK MAJORITY: NEGROES IN COLONIAL SOUTH CAROLINA FROM 1670 THROUGH THE STONO REBELLION by Peter H. Wood (W.W. Norton Press, 1974)
This book represents an early attempt to revise the idea that slavery in America was a homogenous and static system. Relying heavily on primary sources, the text traces the history of slavery in South Carolina, beginning in the year of the colony's founding and ending in the mid-18th century, by which time blacks outnumbered whites in the region.

MASTERS, SLAVES, & SUBJECTS: THE CULTURE OF POWER IN THE SOUTH CAROLINA LOW COUNTRY, 1740-1790 by Robert Olwell (Cornell University Press, 1998)
Olwell picks up where Wood's study of South Carolina slavery, BLACK MAJORITY, leaves off. The text examines relationships and interactions between slaves and their masters in the context of British Imperialism.

THE NEGRO IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by Benjamin Quarles (University of North Carolina Press 1961, 1996)
This text is a foundational study of African-American contributions to the colonial victory in the Revolutionary war.

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