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Slavery and the Making of AmericaDramatic re-enactment of slaves being transported on a boat
Time and Place Slave Memories Resources The Slave Experience

Time and Place return to introduction
1619 1641 1662 1676 1694 1705 1712 1731 1739 1773 1776 1781 1787 1788 1793 1803 1817
1820 1829 1831 1837 1842 1848 1850 1857 1860 1862 1863 1865 1866 1867 1869 1871 1874
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No Escape from Slavery
Virginia enacts a law of hereditary slavery meaning that a child born to an enslaved mother inherits her slave status.

Massachusetts reverses a ruling dating back to 1652 that allowed blacks to train in arms. New York, Connecticut, and New Hampshire pass similar laws restricting the bearing of arms.

In Gloucester County, Virginia, the first documented slave rebellion in the colonies takes place.

Maryland legalizes slavery.

Charles II, King of England, gives the Carolinas to proprietors. Until the 1680s, most settlers in the region are small landowners from Barbados.

New York and New Jersey legalize slavery.

Maryland is the first colony to take legal action against marriages between white women and black men.

The State of Maryland mandates lifelong servitude for all black slaves. New York, New Jersey, the Carolinas, and Virginia all pass similar laws.

Maryland passes a fugitive slave law.

Virginia declares that Christian baptism will not alter a person's status as a slave.

New Jersey passes a fugitive slave law.

The State of Virginia prohibits free blacks and Indians from keeping Christian (i.e. white) servants.

New York declares that blacks who convert to Christianity after their enslavement will not be freed.

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