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Greeks and Romans

State Versus Federal Jurisdiction
"The well-known address used by Demosthenes, when he harangued and animated his assembled countrymen, was 'O Men of Athens.'"
Wilson on Demosthenes

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Chisholm

v.

Georgia
State Versus Federal Jurisdiction

Justice Wilson Separate Opinion
1793
Seal Of The Supreme Court
Excerpt:

When Homer, one of the most correct, as well as the oldest of human authorities, enumerates the other nations of Greece whose forces acted at the siege of Troy, he arranges them under the names of their different Kings or Princes. But when he comes to the Athenians, he distinguishes them by the peculiar appellation of the PEOPLE of Athens. The well-known address used by Demosthenes, when he harangued and animated his assembled countrymen, was "O Men of Athens." With the strictest propriety, therefore, classical and political, our national scene opens with the most magnificent object which the nation could present. "The PEOPLE of the United States" are the first personages introduced.

Text excerpt:

THE FOURTH PHILIPPIC, Demosthenes

Believing, men of Athens, that the subject of your consultation is serious and momentous to the state, I will endeavor to advise what I think important. Many have been the faults, accumulated for some time past, which have brought us to this wretched condition; but none is under the circumstances so distressing as this, men of Athens; that your minds are alienated from public business; you are attentive just while you sit listening to some news, afterward you all go away, and, so far from caring for what you heard, you forget it altogether.


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