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Censorship
"For the actions of men proceed from their opinions; and in the well-governing of opinions, consisteth the well-governing of men's actions."
Thomas Hobbes

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Times Film Corp.

v.

City of Chicago
Censorship

Justice Douglas Dissent
January 23, 1961
Seal Of The Supreme Court
Excerpt:

Regimes of censorship are common in the world today. Every dictator has one; every communist regime finds it indispensable. One shield against world opinion that colonial powers have used was the censor, as dramatized by France in North Africa. Even England has a vestige of censorship in the Lord Chamberlain (Halsbury's Laws of England) who presides over the stage — a system that in origin was concerned with the barbs of political satire. But the concern with political satire shifted to a concern with atheism and with sexual morality — the last being the concern evident in Chicago's system now before us.

Hobbes was the censor's proponent: "It is annexed to the sovereignty, to be judge of what opinions and doctrines are averse, and what conducing to peace; and consequently, on what occasions, how far, and what men are to be trusted withal, in speaking to multitudes of people; and who shall examine the doctrines of all books before they be published. For the actions of men proceed from their opinions; and in the well-governing of opinions, consisteth the well-governing of men's actions, in order to their peace, and concord." (THE LEVIATHAN)


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