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Philosophy

Deportation
"I shall content myself with saying that the subject has been at all times one of the open questions of morals."
John Stuart Mill

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De George
Deportation

Justice Douglas Dissent
May 7, 1951
Seal Of The Supreme Court
Excerpt:

We should not forget that criminality is one thing — a matter of law — and that morality, ethics and religious teachings are another. Their relations have puzzled the best of men. Assassination, for example, whose criminality no one doubts, has been the subject of serious debate as to its morality. (15)

Footnote 15: John Stuart Mill, referring to the morality of assassination of political usurpers, passed by examination of the subject of tyrannicide, as follows: "I shall content myself with saying that the subject has been at all times one of the open questions of morals; that the act of a private citizen in striking down a criminal, who, by raising himself above the law, has placed himself beyond the reach of legal punishment or control, has been accounted by whole nations, and by some of the best and wisest of men, not a crime, but an act of exalted virtue; and that, right or wrong, it is not of the nature of assassination, but of civil war." (ON LIBERTY)


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