Romney’s Remarks Politically Dumb

January 16th, 2012, bySean Nixon

Mitt Romney's recent remarks on economic equality could prove costly. Photo: Gage Skidmore

As the nation celebrates the life and legacy of Dr. King, today’s political landscape underscores just how far America has to go in realizing so much more of Dr. King’s dream of social and economic equality.

With one in two Americans living at or near poverty, you would think a presidential candidate would be in tune enough with the circumstances and conditions of the country and begin proposing ideas or solutions to help solve the problem.

Not Mitt Romney. His poor choice of words, or perhaps, brutal honesty in telling NBC’s Matt Lauer that issues of economic inequality should be discussed in quiet rooms suggests that he’s out of touch with everyday Americans.

As a result, he’s created a huge stir across the airwaves and is being lambasted in the media for his remarks and potentially running voters away from his campaign.

Dr. King spent his last days fighting for the economic rights of American citizens. He wasn’t an elected official, a mayor or even a presidential candidate, and yet, he recognized the needs of people and fought for them.

In economic terms, when you have half of any country’s population in or at poverty, you’re talking about a national crisis. And from a leadership standpoint, when a presidential candidate, running for the highest office in the land, state that conversations concerning these problems should merely be discussed in quiet rooms alongside issues of tax policy, on both counts, it shows a lack of moral conviction and an extremely large dose of cowardice.

If Mitt Romney wants to be a truly great leader for his party and this nation, he should want to move conversations like these from the quiet rooms to the public square. No apparent frontrunner, GOP or otherwise, should ever appear to have their head in the sand on issues like these.

TALK BACK: Do you agree with Romney’s statement that discussions of economic inequity should be discussed in quiet rooms?  You can respond with a Y or N in our comments section.

Last modified: January 16, 2012 at 8:33 pm