STAFF & GUEST BLOG

Tavis’ Summer Reading Recommendations

July 27th, 2011, byStaff

This week, production for Tavis Smiley on PBS began its annual hiatus. Tavis will use the month-long break to not only get some much-needed rest and continue his Foundation’s annual Leadership Institute in Los Angeles, but also to kick off a 15-city national Poverty Tour to raise awareness about the plight of the poor.

Did somebody say something about Tavis getting some much-needed rest?

Our Web site staff did manage to track him down for a few summer reading recommendations. Because Tavis has conversations with so many authors on his television and radio shows, we were curious to know which books he thought we should add to our summer reading lists.

Check out his recommendations below, and be sure to watch his conversation with each author. Tell us what you’re reading this summer as well!

1) The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot
This literary phenomenon and New York Times best seller is the story of a poor Black woman whose cancerous cells were used for science without her permission.

“I think that the story had been told over and over in little magazine articles and newspaper articles, and it was always the same little nugget of the story – this one woman’s cells taken without her knowledge – became this important thing in medicine,” says Skloot. “Nobody really saw much; what the story’s about is her family. That moment in history, it’s ethically complicated, but it was really common to take cells without people’s knowledge in the ’50s.”
Watch the full conversation

2) Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base, by Annie Jacobsen
Jacobsen’s New York Times best seller addresses what is happening at the Nevada air force base and attempts to explain what could be so secretive that U.S. presidents are denied entrance.

According to Jacobsen, “You’ve got all kinds of government presence in the desert, none of which the government will talk about what’s going on there. They still, to this day, will not officially say that Area 51 exists.”
Watch the full conversation

3) Clarence Darrow: Attorney for the Damned, by John Farrell
Focusing on iconic American, Clarence Darrow, Farrell brings to life one of this country’s grandest defense lawyers.

“He had this amazing sense of empathy and compassion,” Farrell says. “When given the choice between taking one route, making a lot of money and joining corporate America or doing something like defending an indigent person who was really stuck, Darrow would come, time and time again, on behalf of … the damned in American life.”
Watch the full conversation

  • freedom liife

    a good book too read is before the mayflower.could not put it down.

Last modified: August 5, 2011 at 2:15 pm