STAFF & GUEST BLOG

The Mystery of Amelia Earhart’s Last Days

June 3rd, 2012, byJeremy Freed

One of the most famous mysteries of the 20th century surrounds the disappearance of Amelia Earhart on her quest to circle the globe in 1937. A female aviation pioneer, she was the first woman to fly solo non-stop across the Atlantic ocean, for which she received the Distinguished Flying Cross, a Congressional medal.

Ever since Earhart’s circumnavigation was cut short 75 years ago, there has been much speculation around the circumstances of her disappearance and death. This week, new evidence has emerged suggesting Earhart, along with navigator Fred Noonan, spent her final days subsisting on fish, mollusks and seabirds on a remote and uninhabited Japanese coral atoll.

From the Christian Science Monitor: “(TIGHAR), a non-profit foundation promoting aviation archaeology and historic aircraft preservation, reported new details Friday leading researchers to this conclusion: Earhart and Noonan, low on fuel and unable to find their next scheduled stopping point – Howland Island – radioed their position, then landed on a reef at uninhabited Gardner Island, a small coral atoll now known as Nikumaroro Island.”

According to the same article, researchers from TIGHAR will return to the site next month and use submersibles to search for remnants of Earhart’s plane.

As well as being historically relevant, and adding a final chapter to one of the most fascinating American stories of the 20th century, the revelation that Earhart’s plane didn’t simply vanish (despite what innumerable conspiracy theorists say) serves as a potent reminder that it’s far easier to put forth an outlandish theory, than it is to actually prove what happened. Conspiracy theories may be provocative, but they are rarely even close to accurate.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Last modified: June 4, 2012 at 3:00 pm