July 9th, 2011, by Jeremy Freed

Samantha Celera on Flickr

One of the great things about this Internet age in which we live is the fact that no matter what you’re into, be it model trains or hang gliding or other, weirder things, you’re never more than a few clicks away from a community of like-minded enthusiasts online. Food is and always has been a big interest of mine; so it’s always a bit of a thrill to discover a new culinary blog–of which there are a seemingly endless supply.

In the world of food blogs there are a few different categories. First and foremost are the so-called “food porn” sites, aptly named for their lustrous photos of meals, desserts and beverages. If you’re hungry, these are a good place to start (or not–depending on how hungry you are). There’s Food Porn Daily, which, as its name suggests, features a new semi-erotic gourmet photo every day. Then there’s FoodPorn.net, which is essentially the same thing in a different format. The Perth, Australia-based blog, The Food Pornographer, offers a slightly wider variety of content, as well as commentary on the foods in the pictures and–unlike the other two–an occasional recipe. My favorite, however, is TasteSpotting, which combines artful photography with links to recipes of all the dishes pictured. It’s a great place to get inspired, or just while away a few minutes admiring delicious things. Mmm… squid and watermelon salad.

The second big category is food specialty blogs, which specialize in one food and one food only. There’s Bread Basketcase, devoted entirely to the baking of bread, a disproportionate number dedicated solely to bacon and many more, for everything from cupcakes to oysters. Deserving of a special mention in this category is Murray’s Cheese, run by the famous Greenwich Village fromagerie, which is without a doubt one of my favorite shops in the world.

The third category is the general food enthusiast sort, and these tend to be my favorites, as they combine the best elements of the other two. Of these, I’m quite partial to Clotilde Dusoulier’s Chocolate & Zucchini, a compendium of recipes, anecdotes and photos documenting the author’s adventures in food. Dusoulier, who is now a full-time food writer, lives in Paris and has a life of which I’m more than a little jealous.

Do you have a favorite food blog? Drop me a line if you want to tell me about it!

July 7th, 2011, by Jeremy Freed

I’ve been on a bit of a world music kick recently, thanks in no small part to blogs like African Gospel Church and Dream Beach Records, both depositories of unusual and danceable tunes from obscure corners of the globe. It was on the latter that I came across one of the most unusual (and catchiest-sounding) artists yet, Kenya’s Joseph Kamaru, who in his cowboy hat and bolo tie, looks like he stepped out of a Nashville honky-tonk.

Kamaru may or may not ever have been to Nashville, but one thing is for sure: he loves country music, and uses that most-American of genres, along with more traditional Kenyan influences, as inspiration for his work. As Dream Beach points out, much of his music isn’t as blatantly country-influenced as this swinging track, but from the multitude of Kamaru videos on YouTube, it all seems to be pretty swinging.

Called “the king of Kikuru pop,” Kamaru has been recording since the late 1960s and, according to AllMusic.com, became renowned for performing “x-rated, adult only” spectacles, which came to an end when he became a born-again Christian in 1993. Can’t seem to find any of those on YouTube, but perhaps that’s for the best.

 

July 6th, 2011, by Sean Nixon

The Pew Research Center recently released its poll results showing that evangelical leaders are losing their influence in the United States. That’s pretty interesting when you think about the founding of this country that, in part, is set on the idea of a free expression of religion.

However, I can’t say that I’m surprised. Americans have arguably been facing a moral decline for decades and have been seduced by the allure of material possessions and influences that only allow temporary highs.

We live in a culture where, through the use of technology, we can splinter and siphon out what we want to hear, when we want to hear it and who we hear it from. We constantly seem to hear reports about “religious men” found in compromising situations with minors and can’t seem to stem the moral tide of corruption that is constantly eroding our values on a day-to-day basis.

Statistics are only a telling of what has been developing in the country for quite some time. No one should seem surprised or shocked.  But rather than merely look at the headline that brought this news to my attention and ask the question, “What’s going on?” I’d offer a few suggestions for the Americans who, statistically speaking, aren’t listening anymore.

1. Don’t be too quick to write someone off as phony just because they’re an evangelical leader. There’s a true message of God out there, but you can’t hear it if you’re not listening.

2. Don’t allow the trappings of success to steer you away from God. Personal success, at times, can make us pay less attention to the needs of those around us and a bit more selfish and less giving. Sometimes, having it “too good” can lead you to stray from God. When everything is going perfect in your life for too long, and you think it’s because of you and how great you are, it could be setting you up for a false sense of independence from God.

3. Remember that life is short. Scripture points out in James 4: 14 that life is like a vapor that appears for a short time and then vanishes away. So, choose how you spend your time wisely. The voices of bold evangelicals will always be around; you’ll have to do your part to make God a priority in your life.

Will evangelicals increasingly be drowned out in a culture with so many other things fighting for our attention?

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
May 26th, 2011, by Jeremy Freed

Remember in 2003, when Arnold Schwarzenegger was running for governor, how a bunch of women came forward saying he’d groped them and otherwise behaved in a matter unbecoming of a public figure (or a decent human being)? Turns out they may not have been Democrat shills after all. Hunh.

I was living in California at the time and remember being quite surprised that the allegations were so easily and effectively swept under the rug. Even if half of the claims were true, what kind of behavior was that for the leader of America’s most populous state? I wondered why it didn’t bother the people voting for him.

In any case, as we all know, he won. Twice. And most of those women were never heard from again… until now. It seems that the whole secret-lovechild-with-the-housekeeper thing did more than ruin the Governator’s marriage. As a recent post on Jezebel reminds us, the affair with his domestic helper may have been consensual, but that appears to be the exception.

Meanwhile, California Democratic Party Chair Eric Bauman is calling for an investigation into whether Schwarzenegger used government funds to pay off his maid/lover. “During Arnold’s campaign when women came forward and raised issues about his sexual advances and activities he and his minions denied them vociferously and actually accused the women who came forward of being liars and manipulators,” said Bauman, “What a shock that it was we Californians who were lied to and manipulated by Arnold.”

And while this may seem like a nice bit of publicity for one Democratic Chair, it seems to have the ring of truth to it, at least according to this statement from a hotel security officer, who claims to have repeatedly seen Schwarzenegger using government vehicles to transport his mistresses to and from his hotel suite.

It’s hard to know if this scandal will quietly disappear as these things tend to do, but at least those of us who suspected this guy wasn’t on the level can feel slightly vindicated. Even so, it’s not a very satisfying feeling.

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
May 24th, 2011, by Staff
TS_readingcoolidge

When Tom Selleck came to the set recently, he brought a gift in honor of Tavis’ new book, FAIL UP: 20 Lessons On Building Success From Failure.

The gift was a quote from Calvin Coolidge about persistence.

Tavis read the quote during the conversation, and a couple of viewers asked that we share the quote with them again online (h/t Tondra and Melany A.).

So here it is. It certainly is powerful.

 

Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘press on’ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.” ~Calvin Coolidge

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
May 15th, 2011, by Jeremy Freed

Erik Prince, the embattled founder of Blackwater — the American private military contractor accused of various shady dealings in the Iraq war — has a new army. After selling Blackwater (since renamed Xe Services), he’s continued his work as a private military consultant, assembling mercenaries for whomever has the cash.

Most recently, according to a lengthy report by The New York Times, Prince has been tasked with assembling an 800-member battalion of a private army for the leaders of Abu Dhabi, whose main function would be counter-terrorism and putting down internal revolts. To this end, Prince and a group of advisers composed of American and British retired combat officers, recently assembled a group of Colombian mercenaries at a desert compound in the Emirate.

According to the Times, while the Colombian soldiers were expected to be ready for deployment within a few weeks of their arrival, it soon became clear that they were far from prepared, some of them having never fired weapons before. Notable, however, was the reason for assembling an army of Spanish-speaking mercenaries (as well as South Africans, British and Americans) in an Arab country. Says the Times, “Former employees said that in recruiting the Colombians and others from halfway around the world, Mr. Prince’s subordinates were following his strict rule: hire no Muslims. Muslim soldiers, Mr. Prince warned, could not be counted on to kill fellow Muslims.”

Of course, mercenary armies are nothing new–from medieval times to the most recent war in Iraq–but this latest revelation sets a disturbing precedent for the area. Like prisons and schools, outsourcing military tasks to the private sector raises a lot of issues of whose best interests are at stake. In Abu Dhabi, the mercenaries would be commanded by that emirate’s ruler, but they would be motivated strictly by a paycheck (and a modest one, according to the Times). No one should be allowed to profit from war, least of all those, like Erik Prince, whose ethics have been repeatedly cast into doubt.

 

 

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
April 24th, 2011, by Jeremy Freed
jf-restrepo-junger-hetherington

Last week, two photojournalists, Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, were killed while covering the popular uprising in Libya. For most of us, who see the images captured by journalists like these in the news every day, it’s easy to forget the real danger that goes into reporting from conflict zones.

Hetherington was known recently for his work on the Academy Award-nominated documentary Restrepo, which he co-directed with author Sebastian Junger. He was also winner of the World Press Photo of the Year award for his shot of an exhausted soldier in Afghanistan. Hondros, too, was an accomplished photographer, who had also worked in Afghanistan, Iraq and Kosovo and had been awarded the Robert Capa Gold Medal, an esteemed war photography commendation.

Here’s an interview with Hetherington on PBS’ NewsHour, in which he discusses his work, as well as his new book of photos from Afghanistan, Infidel. And here’s a gallery of some of Hondros’ work put together by the Guardian.

Of course, for Hetherington and Hondros, they would likely have been the first to tell you that it’s not their own stories that matter, but rather the ones they are trying to capture and send out to the world.

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
April 22nd, 2011, by Staff
larryflynt_rs

How do you write about the sex lives of past presidents without being salacious? If you’re controversial publisher Larry Flynt, you co-write a book with history professor David Eisenbach and call it One Nation Under Sex.

“I knew nobody would want to read a history book written by a pornographer, so I was just covering myself there,” says Flynt in the Web-exclusive video below.

Flynt’s book has been well received, with Publishers Weekly writing, “Flynt and Eisenbach favor analysis over sensationalism, providing a new perspective of the men and women who have shaped our nation.”

In this Web-exclusive video, Flynt explains what he feels we can learn from the sexual transgressions of past presidents and answers the tough question of why Americans seem to be so obsessed with sex.

“People, I think now, want more information, and no book has ever been written like this. Publishers of history books are conservative; they tend to only want politics and policy. They don’t want to know about sex,” Flynt says, adding, “Well, I know that there’s a market out there that does want to know about the sex lives of politicians.”

Be sure to watch the Web-exclusive video below, tune in to the full conversation tonight and share your thoughts. Do the private lives of presidents and elected officials matter? Should we care? Why do we?

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
April 10th, 2011, by Staff
Image via US Dept. of Justice
Image via US Dept. of Justice

Since being sentenced in 2009 to 150 years in prison, we haven’t heard all that much from Bernard Madoff, the man behind the biggest Ponzi scheme in history.

Recently, a couple of Financial Times staffers, David Gelles and Gillian Tett, went down to visit him in prison. They spoke with Madoff for two hours — or rather, Madoff told them his story — in probably the most candid interview he has ever given.

The article, from this week’s FT Magazine, chronicles Madoff’s rise from upstart outsider financier, to one of the most revered men on Wall Street, to one of the biggest villains in the economic crash. He tells his story with a surprising even-handedness, even talking candidly about what he’s been doing in prison (seeing a therapist, reading Danielle Steele novels).

For someone who was the subject of so much media attention, it’s fascinating to hear him tell his story from his own perspective and get a little more insight into how the mind of such a man might work. 

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
April 6th, 2011, by Staff

Most know award-winning veteran talk show host Larry King from his signature CNN program. He’s also a very funny guy. Even though King turns the tables on Tavis by asking the questions in a two-part conversation airing this week, Tavis couldn’t resist moving back into his usual role, if only for a moment.

Watch this preview clip of King describing his upcoming comedy tour, and tune in this Thursday and Friday as the two talkers reflect on their combined 70+ years of broadcasting experience.

Read More »»

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