PRIMER
March 21st, 2012, by Carla Amurao

Photo courtesy: Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.

Airdate | Thursday, March 22, 2012

Hometown | Baltimore, MD

Notable Accomplishments | Writer-producer for the fifth and sixth seasons of The Sopranos and creator-executive producer-head writer-show runner for Mad Men. The former racked up an impressive 21 Emmys and 5 Golden Globes in its six-year run.

Why He’s Buzzing | With the long Mad Men hiatus that ended on Sunday, March 25, 2012, audiences anticipated the premiere of season 5. The series received critical acclaim for its historical authenticity and visual style, resulting in 15 Emmys and 4 Golden Globes and making Mad Men the first basic cable series to win an Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series for all fours years of broadcast (2008-2011).

Matthew Weiner Trivia

  • Wrote the pilot of Mad Men as a spec script while working as a writer on Becker.
  • Not only did he earn an MFA from the University of Southern California School of Cinema-Television (now School of Cinematic Arts), but he also taught an undergraduate screenwriting class in 2004.
  • His son, Marten, plays the recurring role of Glen Bishop in Mad Men. Furthermore, the scene where Glen walks in on Betty Draper in the bathroom (then later asks for a lock of her hair!) is based on an experience from Weiner’s childhood.
  • Was a one-day champion on the trivia-quiz show Jeopardy!

Selection of projects

Television

2000-2002 Becker, Co-producer/producer, writer
2002-2003 Andy Richter Controls the Universe, Supervising producer, writer
2004-2007 The Sopranos, Supervising producer, co-executive producer, executive producer, writer, actor (Episodes “Stage 5” and “Two Tonys” as Manny Safer)
2007-present Mad Men, Executive producer, writer, director
2011 The Simpsons, (Episode “The Man in the Blue Flannel Pants” as businessman [voice])

Mad Men Season Five Trailer

Season Five Promotion Art

PRIMER
March 18th, 2012, by Carla Amurao

Photo courtesy: Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.


Airdate |
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Hometown | Dallas, TX 

Birth name | Marvin Lee Aday (later changed to “Michael Lee Aday”)

Parents | Wilma Artie and Orvis Wesley Aday

Meat Loaf Trivia

  • “Bat Out of Hell” is one of five biggest selling albums of all time.
  • Before “Bat Out of Hell”, Meat Loaf was a high school football player, nightclub bouncer and stage actor.
  • After making a guest appearance on House, Meat Loaf learned the show’s star, Hugh Laurie, is a classically-trained pianist. The end result? A collaboration on the song “If I Can’t Have You” on the album, “Hang Cool Teddy Bear”.
  • According to his IMDB profile, Meat Loaf tells contradictory “official” stories of how he got his stage name. Also, despite the moniker, he doesn’t like to eat meat loaf.
  • In 1978, Meat Loaf fell off the stage and broke his leg during a concert in Canada. He completed the rest of the tour while in a wheel chair.

Web Exclusive

The hard rock musician discusses the eye-opening experience of working with hip-hop legend Chuck D of Public Enemy and Lil Jon.

(View full post to see video)

“Just having those two guys on the record has made my life.” Meat Loaf, on his new respect for hip-hop

Selection of performances and projects

Music (and Honors)

1977 “Bat Out of Hell” – Certified Platinum in U.K. (7x), Australia (24x), United States (14x); Diamond (2x) in Canada
1981 “Dead Ringer” – Certified Platinum in U.S.; Gold in Canada
1983 “Midnight at the Lost and Found” – Certified Gold in U.K .
1984 “Bad Attitude” – Certified Gold in U.K.
1986 “Blind Before I Stop” – Certified Silver in U.K.
1993 “Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell” – Certified Platinum in UK (6x), Canada (9x), U.S. (5x) – Grammy for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo for “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)”
1995 “Welcome to the Neighbourhood” – Certified Platinum in U.K. (3x), Canada, U.S. (2x)
2003 “Couldn’t Have Said It Better” – Certified Platinum in U.K. and U.S.
2006 “Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster is Loose” - Certified Platinum in U.K. and CAN; Gold in Australia and U.S.
2010 “Hang Cool Teddy Bear” – Certified Platinum in U.K.
2011 “Hell in a Handbasket”

Movies

1975 The Rocky Horror Picture Show
1979 Americathon
1980 Roadie
1981 Dead Ringer
1992 Wayne’s World
1998 Black Dog
1999 Fight Club
2000 Blacktop
2001 Formula 51
2002 The 51st State
2004 A Hole in One
2005 BloodRayne
2007 Urban Decay
2008 Meat Loaf: In Search of Paradise
2010 Burning Bright

Television

1992 Tales from the Crypt (Episode “What’s Cookin’” as Chumley)
1997 Nash Bridges (Episode “Wild Card” as Charlie Pep)
1998 South Park (Episode “Chef Aid” – Cameo)
2001 The Ballad of Lucy Whipple (as Amos ‘Rattlesnake Jake’ Frogge)
2006 Masters of Horror (Episode “Pelts” as Jake Feldman)
2009 House (Episode “Simple Explanation” as Eddie)
2009 Ghost Hunters (Episode “Bat Out of Hell” as Himself)
2009 Monk (Episode “Mr. Monk and the Voodoo Curse” as Reverend Hadley Jorgensen)
2009 Citizen Jane (as Detective Jack Morris)
2010 WWE Raw (as Himself)
2010 Glee (Episode “The Rocky Horror Glee Show as Barry Jeffries)
2011 The Celebrity Apprentice (as Himself)

What is your favorite Meat Loaf project? Share your thoughts below.

A LOOK BACK
March 9th, 2012, by Carla Amurao

In celebration of International Women’s Day 2012 (March 8), The Daily Beast hosted its annual Women in the World Summit, a three-day event that highlights challenges of the modern woman across the globe. With an aim to showcase the fearlessness of women, and to incite action and involvement, the event included a wide panel of speakers—including past guest and peace activist Leymah Gbowee.

On Friday, March 9, Gbowee welcomed cheers as she discussed her views on the current debates on contraception and abortion. “It’s time for women to stop being politely angry.” She added, “Why are these women not angry and beating men left and right?”

Our October 2011 conversation with Gbowee, a columnist for The Daily Beast and one of three recipients of the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize, details her book, Mighty Be Our Powers, and the struggles faced by women in politics. Her efforts in banding together Liberia’s Muslim and Christian women in peaceful protest paved the way for a democratic election of its first female head of state.

Watch the conversation to hear her personal struggle for women’s rights and share your thoughts.

(View full post to see video)

“Those women who had seen the worst decided we will step out; we will do what we have to do. Even if we die trying, we will do it…Because the one thing I keep saying to the young women and to my colleagues, we’ve left a legacy…but all of those legacies will only be a legacy if we have young women to walk in our shoes when we leave the stage.”

-Leymah Gbowee

 

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
February 27th, 2012, by Guest Blogger

BY SEAN BREEZE

This post is cross-published at Good Supply.

“Poverty is not a character flaw. It is a lack of money.”

Hearing this quote by Barbara Ehrenreich, while attending the “Remaking America” event at George Washington University, really struck a chord in my mind and heart. I immediately asked myself, how can we construct a proper policy prescription for attacking the multifaceted challenges of poverty when we approach the problem with a preconceived notion that there is something already wrong with the personhood of the poor?

Unwarranted assumptions about the quality of the character of the poor, or lack thereof, are part of the long-standing war on the poor. In general, society has created imagery to villainize the poor based on their character, and, many times, this imagery is reinforced with overt racial themes and substantiated by more subtle undertones. Recently, there have been numerous attempts and several successes with drafting legislation to drug test welfare recipients. Legislation like this provides an example of how laws are enacted that support the widely misguided practice of making assumptions about the character of the poor, from stereotypes of the Black “Welfare Queen” and stories of welfare recipients living high off the hog on their welfare payments.

In 2011, the average Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipient received $133.70 a month. The average payment for a family of four was $496 a month. To be eligible for SNAP, a recipient must make no more than $24,100 a year to support a family of 3 and must be 130% below the poverty line. If making $24,100 a year and receiving an additional $496 a month is considered living the high life, then what do we consider a family who makes $100,000 per year? By our government’s standards, surely the $100,000 family shouldn’t be considered rich. Let’s face it, I don’t know too many people who would sign up for a $24,000 a year deal willingly and happily. Part of creating better policy for addressing the challenges of poverty is to get rid of the stereotypes associated with or reinforcing the notion that the poor are  “getting over” on the rest of society.

After years of villainizing what seemed to be a fringe group of our society, we have now gotten to a point, since our most recent recession, that the ranks of poor have grown. We have all–the rich, the middle class and the lower class–had to come to terms with how close we all are to becoming one of “the poor.”

“Remaking America” used “At Risk: America’s Poor During and after the Recession,” published by Indiana University, as the statistical backdrop for the panel discussion. According to the white paper, 46.2 million (15.1%) people in America live in poverty. As a society, are we willing to believe that 15% of our population is poor based on flawed character? I am not.  What has to be considered is how close all of us are to joining the ranks of the poor. Whether it is a lay-off, reduction of hours at work, a medical emergency, salary decrease due to budget cuts or a car breakdown, many of us are closer to poverty than we acknowledge.

We must deal with the perception of the poor before we can make substantial strides in creating proper policy that addresses the plight of the poor. In order to create policy to help lift more Americans out of poverty, we must align our policy with objectives that sustain, elevate and educate the poor.  Doing this may help our society identify the root causes of poverty. Anti-poverty policy must first be able to support the poor for the moment and, even further, extend into sustaining territory by helping the poor stay above water in regards to meeting their basic human needs. In order to increase their human capital value in the American economy, policy and funding must be created to further educate and train the poor. With future policy being made, these aims will be able to elevate the poor from poverty to prosperity and ultimately, as a whole, we will have a more prosperous society.

Sean Breeze is the political content and pop culture contributor for Good Supply. He has covered events featuring Michael Eric Dyson, Tavis Smiley, Touré, Cornel West and Steve Stoute.

A LOOK BACK
February 13th, 2012, by Staff

Newt Gingrich was one of the first political guests to be featured on Tavis Smiley when the program launched nine years ago.

The author, political consultant and 58th Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives cited Ronald Reagan’s 1976 primary as the inspiration for his candidacy as the Republican Party presidential nominee. In the February 7, 2012 presidential primaries, Gingrich raked in 12.8% of voter support in Colorado and 10.8% in Minnesota, but, as of February 8, Gingrich is expected to fall behind contenders Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney.

In this 2010 conversation, he discusses the public perception that the Republican Party was not the only opposition to its Democratic counterparts, but also an obstruction to passing bills on the Hill. He also discusses the possibility of throwing his hat in the 2012 presidential race.

Watch the 2010 conversation and share your thoughts.

(View full post to see video)
A LOOK BACK
February 13th, 2012, by Staff

Taking a quick stroll down memory lane isn’t a bad thing.

In a world where breaking news changes faster than the blink of an eye, “A Look Back” will offer a chance to revisit past Tavis Smiley conversations. From politicians and entertainers, to athletes, authors and other newsmakers, we’ve got it all. As current events unfold, we will feature relevant guest interviews–straight from the vault.

First from the vault: Newt Gingrich.

SEEN & HEARD
February 10th, 2012, by Staff

Check out images of and quotes from Connie Rice, Michel Hazanavicius, Wael Ghonim, Viola Davis & Octavia Spencer and Suze Orman.

Click on an image below to open the gallery.

All images by Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.

SEEN & HEARD
January 27th, 2012, by Staff

Each week, we will bring you sights and sounds from our studio as guests sit in the chair to have a conversation with Tavis.

Our inaugural “Seen and Heard” is a special one, as it includes an image and quote from Tavis’ 2007 conversation with soul singer Etta James, who recently passed away in Los Angeles.

Check out images of and quotes from Sean Penn, Etta James, Terrence Howard, Kathleen Turner and Seal.

All images by Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.

 

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
January 23rd, 2012, by Guest Blogger

January is National Mentoring Month. In honor of the occasion, we take a look at mentoring organization, WriteGirl.

BY KARI ADWELL

Current WriteGirl mentees. Photo by Thomas Hargis.

This is my first year working as a staff member and writing mentor for WriteGirl – a creative writing and mentoring organization for teen girls, ages 13-18.

Every week, more than 75 professional women writers work one-on-one with girls on creative writing projects.

Every month, WriteGirl hosts a creative writing workshop for over 150 girls and professional women writers in all genres, including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, songwriting, journalism, screenwriting, playwriting, persuasive writing, journal-writing, editing and more.

Every year, WriteGirl publishes an anthology of outstanding work, compiled throughout the school year, by both the mentees and their mentors.

On Sunday, January 15th,  we launched our award-winning, 10-year anniversary anthology, Intensity. In this new book, more than 140 teen girls and women writers from the L.A. area share their creative stories, poetry, lyrics, novel excerpts and perspectives.

__

Menudo

“I know this girl. Her name
is Joanna, Mexican-Honduran
Beauty Queen, mother of one at fourteen
I know this girl. She made me chorizos,
she introduced me to my first pupusa,
she was the first girl I kissed.
I know her; she’s walking up right now
in a skin-tight black V-neck, skinny jeans
and Vans, eyeliner, a precise silhouette of her
top lid. I know Iris, palms sweaty,
hair crinkled with Aquanet hairspray and mousse.
I know mi hermana, my tan sister, a subdued,
superb shade of brown. I know Coralia, she
has Jose tattooed on her neck, her Baby Daddy, her love.
I know Barbie/Eeyore/Droopy/Bianca/Flaca/
Skittles, I know how R’s roll off her tongue,
I know the sound of one dollar rosaries
hitting her chest, I know the click clack
clang bang of her silver hoops, I know her.
She is my best friend; she is my childhood confidante.
She is old news, new tears.
Forgotten girl, formed by corroding,
rooftops, infantile screams,
menudo and premature motherhood.”

- J. Curtis, age 15 (excerpt from Intensity)

__

We are going, boldly, into our 11th season with many awards under our belt and a 100% success rate of our senior girls going to college!

On a personal note, our girls continue to be an endless inspiration to me. Shining when they read aloud, they find a place in the world.

Current WriteGirl mentees and alumna. Photo by Thomas Hargis.

When we held our mentee interview day in November, I was so pleased to see the girls come in, sit down, take an object to write about and work quietly. They were respectful of one another’s space and, when it came time to read their work, they all listened patiently, applauding when each reader concluded.

It gives me chills to recount that experience, for we have all been young, awkward teens, competing for space, and we all know how girls can be exceedingly cruel; however, there is something about WriteGirl that inspires camaraderie and human appreciation like I have never seen before. I dare say it is like they are on sacred ground.

Kids want guidance. They need mentors. No matter how much they may look at you like you are crazy, when their friends aren’t looking they will soften and say things like, “Is this good enough? I want to make sure it’s right.” To which I respond, “I let that question hold me back from experiencing my own writing for a long, long time. I don’t want you to fall into the same trap. There is no right, and there is no good enough. There is only what is right for YOU. If it comes out of YOU, it is right, and it is always good enough.”

This was a specific incident. The girl was a talented writer with beautiful penmanship and a want in her eyes to express herself.  To be heard. All she needed was a little cajoling.

And, most times, a little cajoling is all it takes. It is amazing how quickly the girls can go from being reticent, hiding behind their journals and saying they don’t have anything to say, to having a (friendly) rap battle across the room. I have seen it take less than 20 minutes! And THAT makes mentoring fun and rewarding for us all.

Mentoring has changed my life for the better. I found WriteGirl by doing a Volunteer Match search. If you  feel you have any wisdom to impart or just time to give someone an ear, I highly suggest being a mentor. You’ll be glad you did it.

Happy Mentoring Month!

Kari Adwell is the Events Coordinator at WriteGirl. She mentors (when time allows) with the In-Schools program offered by WriteGirl at Camp Scudder in Santa Clarita, CA. She is also an essayist and aspiring screenwriter. She too loves to read aloud. [Photo by Brad Carter Photography.]

STAFF & GUEST BLOG
January 19th, 2012, by Staff

Welcome to our 9th season on PBS!

The first week of Season 9 is off to a wonderful start, with our recent three-part “Remaking America” panel discussion and two full nights of our conversation with Academy Award-winning actor and tireless human rights activist Sean Penn.

In addition to our Season 9 launch, we’ve got fresh digs, as our show is now housed in L.A.’s state-of-the-art Encompass Digital Media Studios, just minutes from downtown Los Angeles.

On-set photo. Encompass Digital Media Studios. Photo courtesy: Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.

Photo courtesy: Van Evers, Tavis Smiley Media, Inc.

Hope you’ve been watching this week and will continue to tune in each night throughout the season.

And remember, as always, episodes are available on our site the day after they have aired on your local PBS station.

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