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June 15th, 2008
Gutted
Info-Graphic: A Guide to Sushi Fish: Introduction

Seafood is often recommended as a healthy source of low-fat protein and, increasingly, it is an important part of conscientious American diets. Yet the methods used to harvest our oceans aren’t always as ecologically sound as we might like to think. As stocks of our favorite fish plummet or become tainted by environmental contaminants, we are forced to acknowledge that the sea is a limited resource that must be managed wisely if future generations are to enjoy its fruits. Among over-fished species scientists recommended we avoid at the dinner table are: Chilean seabass, Atlantic cod, King crab, Monkfish, red snapper, imported swordfish, and bluefin tuna. Good alternatives include: black seabass, bluefish, clams, halibut, herring, lobster, mahi mahi, oysters, squid, domestic swordfish, striped bass, tilapia, and yellowfin tuna. Select one of the fish below to learn more about the issues related to its harvesting and how you as a consumer can make an intelligent mealtime decision.

Sources: Monterey Bay Aquarium, Oceans Alive

  • Ken Peterson

    Beginning October 22, 2008, consumers and chefs will have an easier time choosing sustainable sushi. Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, along with the folks at Blue Ocean Institute and Environmental Defense Fund, will all release sushi pocket guides that recommend best choices and species to avoid. They’ll also be available online. Check it out at http://www.seafoodwatch.org, http://www.blueocean.org and http://www.edf.org.

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