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January 21st, 2009
Introduction

ABOUT THE ISSUE
Women have become primary targets in today’s armed conflicts and are suffering unprecedented casualties. Simultaneously, they are emerging as necessary partners in brokering lasting peace and as leaders in forging new international laws governing conflict. Yet the image of war portrayed by the media covers very little of either end of this spectrum — until now. Discussions about the multiplicity of women’s roles in war and peace are underway in boardrooms, conference halls, and on the floor of the U.N., but the media has lagged behind, offering images of women in conflict situations that are rarely nuanced and portraying them solely as collateral damage — when they are seen as “a story” at all.

ABOUT THE SERIES
THIRTEEN and Fork Films are producing a bold new mini-series Women, War & Peace to challenge the conventional wisdom that war and peace are men’s domain and to place women at the center of an urgent dialogue about conflict and security. Women, War & Peace will focus on women’s strategic role in the post-Cold War era, where globalization, arms trafficking, and illicit trade have intersected to create a whole new type of war.

Women, War & Peace will present its groundbreaking message across the globe using all forms of media, including U.S. and international primetime television, radio, print, and web. PBS is proud to be the first to bring this conversation to primetime national television. Planned for broadcast in early 2011, Women, War & Peace will be the most comprehensive global media initiative ever mounted on the roles of women in war and peace.

Women, War & Peace is spearheaded by Executive Producers Abigail E. Disney, Pamela Hogan, and Gini Reticker.  The 5-part series will include the U.S. television premiere of Reticker and Disney’s previous collaboration, the acclaimed Pray the Devil Back to Hell, about the role women played in bringing peace to Liberia after 14 years of civil war. The film won the Best Documentary Prize at the 2008 Tribeca Film Festival and the Silverdocs Witness Award, among others, and was the first film to be shown at The World Economic Forum at Davos. Hogan and Reticker won an Emmy for their previous collaboration, WIDE ANGLE’s Ladies First, about the leadership role of Rwandan women 10 years after the genocide.

  • James

    Hi! This is a remarkable story how the women in Liberia after suffering through years of war peacefully stopped the bloodshed and violence. Forced the dictator out of the country and now run the country. A woman president, majority in the cabinet and have taken positive actions by creating support mechanisms not only economically, but also socially by empowerment. I wish everyone could have seen the short presentation on pbs tonite. If you can find it on youtube or other means I’d highly recommend it if you can’t wait until 2010! Why the national media has not broadcast this is unbelievable. Maybe Africa and the world can change peacefully after all!

  • Beverly Lachow

    I was deeply moved and very impressed by these women. They give me hope that one day there may be peace in this world.

  • Andre Sheldon

    Hello,

    Leymah and women can change the world. The whole concept is as Disney stated in the interview, “classic Gandhi nonviolence,” therefore if women rally utilizing nonviolence, with a King or Gandhi type plan, they could change the world. Please investigate a plan, or guideline, called a Global Strategy of Nonviolence, For the Children. (www.GSofNV.org). Thank you PBS. Thank you James.
    Thank you Leymah and Abilgail.

  • SJ Braun

    I also was impressed by this woman and all the women of Liberia; they are remarkibly brave. Hopefully the story will appear on utube and twitter and anywhere women can make this much of a difference. Hopefully this could work worldwide; Afganistan would be a greatly needed place to end the killing war.

  • Comment

    The world in the past has been ruled by force and man has dominated over woman by reason of his more forceful and aggressive qualities both of body and mind. But the scales are already shifting, force is losing its weight, and mental alertness, intuition and the spiritual qualities of love and service, in which woman is strong, are gaining ascendancy. Hence the new age will be an age less masculine and more permeated with the feminine ideals, or, to speak more exactly, will be an age in which the masculine and feminine elements of civilization will be more properly balanced.

    ~Abdul’Baha
    1844-1921

  • Carly

    Abigail, I heard you speak at the UNIFEM/USNC conference this past weekend about Women, War and Peace and was really inspired by its important message. I had never really thought about women in the context of war and you made me want to get the word out there about this issue, so I wrote an entry about your movie (see June 13 entry) on my blog: http://wakingluna.com.

    Thanks to you and your co-producer for bringing attention to this issue!

    ~Carly

  • Carly

    Abigail, I heard you speak at the UNIFEM/USNC conference this past weekend about Women, War and Peace and was really inspired by its important message. I had never really thought about women in the context of war and you made me want to get the word out there about this issue, so I wrote an entry about your movie (see June 13 entry) on my blog: http://wakingluna.com.

    Thanks to you and your co-producer for bringing attention to this issue!

    Carly

  • Kelly

    I have been showing your film “Pray the Devil Back to Hell” to everyone, small and large groups, adults and students. This film has been incredibly useful in showing the strength of women in war and that one women can make a difference and many women can change the world. It is miraculous that probably the first time in history that you have both Muslim and Christian women banding together to make a change. What a great example for the world! Keep making films to open the eyes of the world to the atrocities of war.
    Thank you Gini and Abigail for your gift!

  • Christine Matthie

    May I show these clips in my classroom? I teach History and would love to add these current events along with the theme of women in history.
    thank you for your work,
    Christine Matthie

  • admin

    You are welcome to show the clips in your classroom, either by streaming them from our site (which is free) or by using a DVD. Many DVDs of previous Wide Angle seasons are available for purchase here: http://ffh.films.com/wideangle

  • Melissa Dey Hasbrook

    Are there dates set for the broadcast of this mini-series? Organizers in my community would be very interested.

  • admi

    Hi Melissa,

    Thank you for your interest! The Women, War & Peace team is anticipating airing on PBS in the spring or fall of 2011, but please check back often for details and updates. You can also subscribe to our newsletter here: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wp-content/cc-signup/form_wideangle.php?KeepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&height=100&width=300

  • Herbert Flores

    Please keep me posted when this report will be broadcast…

  • Wm Babbington

    Admittedly,I have no idea what this series is about but being PBS I can only imagine it has an anti-US slant and no doubt finds a way to blame Bush,Christians and Israel for the woes of the world.Am I wrong?

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