WOMEN WAR & PEACE | PBS

Tag: WWP

December 15, 2010

War and Gender

Professor Joshua Goldstein debunks the idea that biology hardwires men for fighting wars and women for staying on the sidelines on this week’s podcast.

December 1, 2010

Art From the Ashes of Ruin

Playwright and activist Lynn Nottage explains how after interviewing survivors of Congo’s civil war in 2004, she was inspired to write Ruined, which earned her a Pulitzer Prize. Mixing “passion, purpose and art,” Nottage hopes the play will impact people long after curtain-down.

November 17, 2010

Peaceful Protest in the West Bank

Documentary filmmaker Julia Bacha takes us to the Middle East to explore the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. She talks about her new film, Budrus, which features a Palestinian village that protested Israeli forces through creative, non-violent means.

November 10, 2010

Understanding Sexual Violence in Congo

For our first podcast episode, we go to the Democratic Republic of Congo, a region that has been called the “rape capital of the world.” Jocelyn Kelly and Dr. Julie VanRooyen, both of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, have spoken extensively with rape victims and perpetrators in the region and share their findings.

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November 5, 2010

Resolution 1325 is a Starting Point

The United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325, adopted in 2000, mandated women’s participation in peace processes and sought to better protect women from sexual and gender-based violence. Eleven years on, two women’s rights activists argue how effective — if at all — the resolution has proven to be.

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November 5, 2010

Resolution 1325 has Failed Women

The United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325, adopted in 2000, mandated women’s participation in peace processes and sought to better protect women from sexual and gender-based violence. Eleven years on, two women’s rights activists argue how effective — if at all — the resolution has proven to be.

October 29, 2010

A Brief History of International Law

From the Geneva Conventions to the passage of United Nations Resolution 1325, women’s rights under international law have emerged as a major policy priority.

October 15, 2010

Afghan Midwife Programs Aim to Curb Infant Mortality

Photographer Kate Holt documents the Afghan midwifery programs that aim to combat the country’s infant mortality rate, the world’s highest. Young Afghan women are trained as midwives and then sent back to their communities to work.

October 7, 2010

The World’s Most Famous Female Hostage

Ingrid Betancourt aspired to become Colombia’s first female president; instead, she became the world’s most famous female hostage. Here, she talks to Women, War & Peace about the many roles women play in Colombia’s long-running internal conflict.

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October 5, 2010

Goodbye to Another Killing Machine

The idea of making swords into plowshares has always been a favorite of series producer Abigail Disney. When a friend approached her with the idea of buying AK-47s from Congo and melting them down for jewelry, she jumped at the chance.

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