I Am Not Your Negro

I Am Not Your Negro

January 15, 2018

by

Raoul Peck

Oscar nominee I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished to examine race in America then and now.

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About the Documentary

I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, a radical narration about race in America, using the writer’s original words, as read by actor Samuel L. Jackson. Alongside a flood of rich archival material, the film draws upon Baldwin’s notes on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr. to explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America.

Raoul Peck’s Oscar-nominated documentary is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of these three leaders, Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for.

The Filmmakers

Raoul Peck

Raoul Peck’s complex body of work includes feature narrative films like The Man by the Shore (Competition Cannes 1993), Lumumba (Director’s Fortnight, Cannes 2000, bought and aired by HBO), Sometimes in April (HBO, Berlinale 2005), Moloch Tropical (Toronto 2009, Berlin 2010) and Murder in Pacot (Toronto 2014, Berlin 2015).

Full Credits

Awards

  • NEWS & DOCUMENTARY EMMY AWARD

    Outstanding Arts and Culture Documentary

  • Academy Award Nomination

    Best Documentary Feature

  • BAFTA Award (British Academy of Film and Television Arts)

    Best Documentary

  • Independent Spirit Awards Nomination

    Best Documentary

  • International Documentary Association

    Creative Recognition Award

  • César Award (France)

    Best Documentary

Learn more about the documentary

Join the Discussion

Do you agree with James Baldwin that "not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed if it is not faced"? What in this film gives you hope we can find the answers to the questions on race that Baldwin posed?

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