News Wrap: In Pennsylvania, Trump thanks black voters

JUDY WOODRUFF: After a week filled with Cabinet announcements from President-elect Trump, it came to a close with a controversial ambassadorial nominee, and the last few rallies for what he's calling his "thank you" tour.

WILLIAM BRANGHAM: Hershey, Pennsylvania, was Mr. Trump's latest stop last night, where he made a point of thanking African-American supporters, albeit in front of a largely white audience.

DONALD TRUMP (R), President-Elect: I talk about crime, I talk about lack of education, talk about no jobs, and I'd say, what the hell do you have to lose, right? It's true.

And they're smart and they picked up on it like you wouldn't believe. And you know what else? They didn't come out to vote for Hillary. They didn't come out. And that was big — so thank you to the African-American community.

WILLIAM BRANGHAM: But exit polls tell a different story. Eight percent of blacks voted for the president-elect; 88 percent went for Clinton.

The latest transition team announcement was Mr. Trump's pick for U.S. ambassador to Israel — David Friedman, who holds controversial positions on Israel.

DAVID FRIEDMAN, Bankruptcy Lawyer: A Trump administration will never pressure Israel into a two-state solution or any other solution that is against the wishes of the Israeli people.

WILLIAM BRANGHAM: Friedman is a bankruptcy lawyer from New York who represented Trump in the past. He rejects the two-state solution as a, quote, "suicidal peace" and says Jews who do support it are worse than Holocaust collaborators. And he says the U.S. State Department — where he'll be an employee — has a, quote, "100 year history of anti-Semitism."

Friedman also supports the highly controversial idea of moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Today, Mr. Trump held meetings in New York, including with President Obama's Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson.

While at the White House, future chief of staff Reince Priebus got advice from current chief of staff Denis McDonough and a host of other former chiefs of staff.

For the "PBS NewsHour", I'm William Brangham.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Thank you, Brangham.

And late today, there were several late news reports that President-elect Trump will nominate Republican Representative Nick Mulvaney of South Carolina to head the White House Office of Management and Budget. The official announcement is expected on Monday.

In the day's other news: bitter winter weather blasted the northeastern U.S., closing schools and roadways amid perilous driving conditions. Boston recorded its coldest temperature on this day in over a century — four degrees. Meanwhile, a blizzard warning was issued in Upstate New York, with wind chills plunging 20 to 30 degrees below zero.

And in New York City, residents shared their strategies for surviving the arctic blast.

WOMAN: I've heard it a good plan to put on layers, so I am layered up. I mean, I look like one of those sandwiches that you know, three pieces of bread, and you got the lettuce and the tomatoes.

MAN: You got to keep moving around, or else if you stay still your toes freeze up, your hands freeze up.

JUDY WOODRUFF: You got to hand it to them.

Farther west, the Oklahoma City area had to contend with freezing rain. Slick roads were to blame for three deaths overnight and over 100 crashes.

The Pentagon says a Chinese warship has seized a U.S. Navy underwater drone in the South China Sea. It happened yesterday, northwest of the Subic Bay, off the Philippines. It was believed to be the first such incident. Pentagon officials said the unmanned drone was collecting unclassified scientific data. The U.S. has issued a formal diplomatic protest, demanding its return.

North Carolina's Republican Governor Pat McCrory signed a law today stripping his Democratic successor of some power. It merges the state's boards of elections and ethics, and mandates an equal number of Democrats and Republicans. Governors used to pick a majority of members from their own party. Hundreds of protesters rallied inside North Carolina's legislative building this week, accusing Republicans of undermining democracy. Incoming Governor Roy Cooper has threatened to sue.

American drugmaker Mylan has started selling a generic version of its EpiPen. The life-saving allergy treatment will cost $300 for a pack of two. That's half the price of its branded option.

Earlier this year, high EpiPen costs triggered national criticism and inquiries from Congress. Stocks closed slightly lower on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones industrial average lost more than eight points to close at 19,843, the NASDAQ fell 19, and the S&P 500 slipped nearly four.

For the week, the Dow gained nearly half a percent. Both the NASDAQ and the S&P 500 dropped a fraction of a percent.

And mourners bid goodbye to a national hero today, as John Glenn's casket lay in honor at Ohio's state capitol in Columbus. The first American astronaut to orbit the earth served more than two decades as a U.S. senator from Ohio. He died last week at 95. Hundreds of visitors paid their respects at the first of several events honoring Glenn. A memorial service is being held tomorrow at Ohio State University.

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