News Wrap: Supreme Court sends transgender bathroom case back to lower court

JOHN YANG: In the day's other news: The U.S. Supreme Court said it won't hear a case on transgender bathroom use in public schools after all. A lower court had ruled in favor of a Virginia teenager who wanted access to the boys' bathroom.

Since then, the Trump administration rolled back federal guidelines supporting that stance. Today's action sends the case back to the lower court for further review.

In a separate case, the high court ruled that ferreting out racial bias can override the sanctity of jury deliberations. The justices ruled 5-3 for a man convicted on sex charges in Colorado. He argued that a juror's anti-Mexican comments tainted his trial. He can now seek a new trial.

North Korea successfully test-launched four more missiles this morning, raising new alarm. They were fired from northwest of Pyongyang and flew an average of 620 miles. Three of them landed in Japanese waters. Japan condemned the launches, as did the South Korean Foreign Ministry.

CHO JUNE-HYUCK, South Korean Foreign Ministry Spokesman (through translator): This provocation clearly reveals the North Korean regime's reckless willingness to continue its nuclear and missile developments, despite unified warnings from the international community. North Korea should realize that its frenzied obsession with only result in self-isolation and self-destruction.

JOHN YANG: The North Korean missile tests coincided with a joint U.S.-South Korean military drill.

In Yemen, the U.S. kept up a new air campaign against al-Qaida militants over the weekend. Witnesses say suspected U.S. drones attacked in two provinces, going after a training camp and other targets. Separately, the Pentagon confirmed that a U.S. airstrike last week in Yemen killed a former Guantanamo Bay detainee.

A retired policeman in the Philippines testified today that President Rodrigo Duterte was linked to nearly 200 killings when he was a mayor. The victims allegedly included political opponents, and were carried out by a death squad. The retired officer appeared as part of a Senate investigation into extrajudicial killings in Davao City, where Duterte was mayor for 22 years.

ARTURO LASCANAS, Retired Police Officer (through interpreter): I can't make myself take to my grave these dark and evil secrets from my life born out of my obedience to Mayor Rodrigo Duterte's orders and to his campaign against criminality and illegal drugs. I had blind obedience and loyalty to the point that I was indirectly involved in killing my two brothers.

JOHN YANG: Duterte brought his anti-drug campaign to the presidency eight months ago. Since then, more than 8,000 people have been killed nationwide.

Back in this country, two the secretary of homeland security, John Kelly, told CNN he'd consider separating women and children who cross the Mexican border illegally in order to deter those crossings.

And in a speech, Housing Secretary Ben Carson caused a stir. He praised immigrants' work ethic and said there were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships. A spokesman said Carson didn't mean to equate immigration and slavery.

The Pentagon says it's investigating reports of U.S. Marines sharing nude photographs of female Marines, veterans and others. Some of the images were taken without the women's knowledge. They appeared on a private Facebook page called Marines United. It had some 30,000 members.

And on Wall Street, stocks were broadly lower, due in part to China trimming its economic growth outlook. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 51 points to close at 20954. The Nasdaq fell 21 points, and the S&P 500 slipped nearly eight.

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