'It's hard to believe'; Dylan breaks silence over Nobel Prize win

Rock musician Bob Dylan performs at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles in May 2004. Photo by Rob Galbraith/Reuters

After two weeks of silence, Bob Dylan has finally acknowledged his Nobel honor.

In an interview with The Telegraph, the 75-year-old musician said it was "hard to believe" the Swedish Academy awarded him the Nobel Prize in literature.

Dylan said the honor was "amazing, incredible. Whoever dreams about something like that?"

Nobel judges said they granted the award to Dylan "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition."

Dylan became the first musician in the history of the literature prize to win. He was also the first American to nab the honor since author Toni Morrison in 1993.

"The news about the Nobel Prize left me speechless," he also told an Academy member. "I appreciate the honor so much."

By any measure, Bob Dylan is one of the most important and influential popular songwriters of his era. Now he's also a Nobel laureate in literature, a choice that came as a surprise. Jeffrey Brown talks to singer/songwriter James Taylor and others about the way Dylan's writing helped so many navigate a changing world.

Dylan, famously elusive, took his time in acknowledging the award. There was a passing mention on his official website, but it was taken down within 24 hours.

The Nobel committee also had a difficult time reaching Dylan by phone or email, enough to prompt one Academy member to call the musician "impolite and arrogant."

According to the Nobel Foundation, however, it's not yet certain if Dylan will attend the Stockholm ceremony in early December.

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