What we know so far about the London subway attack

Police, fire and ambulance crew attend to an incident at Parsons Green underground station in London, Britain. Photo by Luke MacGregor/Reuters

A homemade bomb was detonated on a packed train in West London Friday morning, wounding at least 22 people. Authorities said most of the victims had "flash burns."

Authorities are treating the incident as a terrorist attack, making it the fifth one in Britain this year.

What happened?

    Emergency and police officials responded to reports of an explosion around 8:20 a.m. local time at the Parsons Green train station in London.
    Photos circulated on social media show a white bucket inside a grocery bag. Commuters who were reportedly near the explosion saw fire emanate from the bucket and fill the train.

    "I could smell the burning. I walked down the platform and saw the bucket on fire," commuter Eduardo Moreira told the BBC.

    Upon hearing the explosion, commuters on their way to work rushed away from the train in a panic.
    Nearly two hours after the first reports of the explosion, authorities said they were treating the incident as a terrorist attack.

What we know

    Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley of the Metropolitan Police said the explosion came from an "improvised device." Scotland Yard said no arrests have been made yet in connection with the attack.
    No one appears to be seriously hurt. The London ambulance service said in a statement that none of the victims "are thought to be in a serious or life-threatening condition."
    BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner reported that the device "was designed to kill and maim a large number of people," but "failed to explode properly."
    Friday's attack is being described as London's fifth terrorist attack this year. In June, attacks near the London Bridge killed seven people. By BBC's count, all five attacks in 2017 have claimed 36 lives.

How are leaders responding?

    British Prime Minister Theresa May said in a statement, "My thoughts are with those injured at Parsons Green and the emergency services who, once again, are responding swiftly and bravely to a suspected terrorist incident."
    London mayor Sadiq Khan, said the city "utterly condemns the hideous individuals who attempt to use terror to harm us and destroy our way of life."
    In a series of tweets, President Donald Trump said a "larger, tougher" U.S. travel ban was needed after the London attack. The president also said Friday's attack was carried out "by a loser terrorist" and appeared to suggest that authorities there failed to prevent it.

READ MORE: Trump calls for 'larger, tougher' travel ban after London subway attack

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