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News wrap Tuesday, Nov. 30: Iran nuclear deal recapped, as talks to revive it resume

November 30, 2021

Summary

In Monday’s news wrap, Iran pressed for an end to U.S. sanctions as talks resumed on reviving the 2015 nuclear deal (watch video 00:23s to 1m:09s). A federal judge in St. Louis blocked a federal COVID vaccine mandate for health care workers in 10 states. Leftist Xiomara Castro will likely become Honduras’ first female president. Swedish lawmakers have elected Magdalena Andersson as their first female leader — again.

For background on what was in the 2015 nuclear deal, watch Vox’s How the Iran nuclear deal works, explained in 3 minutes.

Five Facts

  • Who was part of the nuclear deal discussed in the news wrap?
  • What did the nuclear deal say?
  • Where is Iran located? (locate here first, then check your answer here!)
  • When was the nuclear deal signed?
  • Why does Iran want the U.S. to remove economic sanctions?

Focus Questions

Do you think the U.S. should resume talks on a new nuclear deal with Iran? Why or why not?

Media literacy: Aside from the Iran nuclear deal story, what news item caught your eye? Explain why.

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For More

Helpful background on the nuclear deal via Associated Press’s Iran nuclear deal talks resume, EU chair feels ‘positive’ article:

The United States left the deal under then-President Donald Trump’s “maximum pressure” campaign against Tehran in 2018.

 

The nuclear deal saw Iran limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. Since the deal’s collapse, Iran now enriches small amounts of uranium up to 60 percent purity — a short step from weapons-grade levels of 90 percent. Iran also spins advanced centrifuges barred by the accord and its uranium stockpile now far exceeds the accord’s limits.

 

Iran maintains its atomic program is peaceful. However, U.S. intelligence agencies and international inspectors say Iran had an organized nuclear weapons program up until 2003. Nonproliferation experts fear the brinkmanship could push Tehran toward even more extreme measures to try to force the West to lift sanctions.

Read the full article here:

Media literacy education

What is media literacy?

Media literacy is the ability to access, evaluate and create all types of media, including news media.

All of NewsHour Classroom's resources contain lessons in media literacy, including questions like who produced the piece and what do you know about them?

Start by evaluating this video introducing NewsHour Classroom here.

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