Downloads: Press Release

“This devastatingly raw documentary shows that for some the fighting may stop, but the suffering continues…Empathetic and rigorous, [the film] burns low and slow.”
— Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, affects almost 30 percent of the 834,467 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans treated through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. [Source: Department of Veterans Affairs] Consumed by anger and traumatic memories long after their return, soldiers often resort to drugs or suicide [Sources: TIME and Department of Veterans Affairs] to end their suffering.

Filmmaker Laurent Bécue-Renard provides a searing account of how the disorder has affected veterans and their families in Of Men and War, an unparalleled look at the enduring consequences of PTSD and the role treatment can play in helping soldiers reclaim their lives. The documentary, an Official Selection of the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, has its national broadcast premiere during the 29th season of POV (Point of View) on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 2016 on PBS. American television’s longest running independent documentary series, POV is the winner of a 2013 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions.

The film, made between 2003 and 2014, begins with a scenic drive through California’s Napa Valley, where therapist and social worker Fred Gusman, who pioneered revolutionary PTSD programs at the Veterans Administration in the late 1970s, opened The Pathway Home residential treatment center in Yountville in 2008. The beauty of the surroundings stands in stark contrast to the intense inner turmoil suffered by the veterans arriving by van.

Bécue-Renard filmed the soldiers speaking for the first time about their experiences. “I leveled my weapon, led my target and I pulled the trigger,” one veteran recalls during a group therapy session, adding that when he tried to move the body, “a big chunk of his brain fell on my boot.” Tears gathering, he recalls that he was soon unnerved by one of the corpse’s open eyes. “He just kept looking at me.”

The veterans’ anguished reactions to their own words and their descriptions of combat are unforgettable. One recalls being covered by a “mist” of blood after a fellow soldier was shot in the neck, while another describes smelling his own burning flesh. Their recollections are often punctuated by tears and fist-pounding, or long periods of stunned silence as they contemplate what they’ve just said.

Survival in a war zone required a hardened attitude—”Rage and anger carried me through everything,” says one veteran—accompanied by alienation even from those in their units. “He was there and then he was gone,” a soldier says of a friend killed during their deployment together in Iraq. “It’s hard being close to anybody because you know they’re going to leave any time.” These attitudes did not disappear when combat tours ended.

While deployed soldiers eagerly look forward to going home, they often take the war with them.

“The return to civilian life is not what they thought it would be,” says Gusman, The Pathway Home’s lead therapist. One veteran says that he “woke up mad” and “took things out” on loved ones. “When you come back you feel like you should have died over there. It would have been a hell of a lot easier to just fall down over there and not get back up.” Something as ordinary as driving can cause severe distress; in the combat zone, a soldier explains, an approaching vehicle was always seen as potentially carrying a bomb. That fear returns if a car pulls too close to his in traffic.

The war resurfaces in nightmares and panic attacks. A sudden noise might trigger a flashback. Other times, all it takes is a disagreement with a spouse or an ambiguous look from a stranger. Then the groundswell takes over—all that was buried from the war boils up, and the veteran lashes out. Some girlfriends and spouses understandably feel threatened. “The day I came home from Iraq was the last time I saw my daughter,” says one soldier. “I was given a restraining order.” The family has remained estranged ever since.

The film underscores another problem: Seeking help for PTSD can be a difficult step to take. “What we have is embarrassing,” a soldier says. It makes him feel “small” and “defective.” For their part, wives and girlfriends often feel helpless. “I’m scared he’s going to give up trying,” says one. Discouraged and adrift, many veterans spend countless hours playing video games, drinking or abusing drugs.

While the immersive therapy at The Pathway Home is demanding, the film shows it can have positive results—and is sometimes the only hope for family survival. A veteran candidly explains that his wife “said if you don’t go to this program, she’s like ‘I’m going to divorce you.’ And we want to stay married. We’re working on it, but she’s not playing around, and I don’t blame her.”

Bécue-Renard says his camera performed a significant role in the soldiers therapy. “They came to perceive the filming itself as an additional glimmer of hope. Consciously or not, the veterans began to sense that voicing their brutal experiences might uncover deeper meaning: Their stories might contribute to a greater public consciousness of the hardships veterans confront long after the war’s end.”

Of Men and War shows that for many veterans, recovery will be a lengthy process. Although therapists cite the necessity of forgiveness, one soldier, who killed a colleague by mistake, responds, “I think it would be really selfish for me to learn to forgive myself.”

Of Men and War came out of a reflection on what was left unspoken by my grandfathers,” says Bécue-Renard. “They had died by the time I was born—but they had also staunchly refused to talk about their experiences from the First World War while they were alive. In my first film, War-Wearied (De guerre lasses), I broached this subject with three widows who survived the Bosnian war. In a sense, that film was a portrait of my grandmothers. All the while, the war experiences of my grandfathers continued to haunt me. Of Men and War is my way of honoring them.

“It took 11 years between my first idea for the film—when the Iraq war began in 2003—and its completion in May 2014. I spent 14 months in the therapy center and returned many times in the four years that followed.

“Filming therapy was a way of acknowledging people who had decided to move forward with their lives. Some days I’d leave the therapy room overwhelmed. How was I to make sense out of this mess? How could I communicate it to an audience? I became convinced that from all this mud, I could eke out rays of light. In doing so, I could find meaning for the protagonists in Of Men and War as well as for its viewers.”

About the Filmmaker:

Laurent Bécue-Renard, Writer/Director/Producer

Laurent Bécue-Renard is a French director and producer. In 1995 and 1996, while living in Sarajevo during the city’s siege, he served as editor-in-chief of the magazine Sarajevo Online and published a series of short stories entitled “The Sarajevo Chronicles.” After the conflict, he began exploring war’s enduring impact on three widows at a rural therapy center. The documentary he wrote, directed and produced about them, War-Wearied (De guerre lasses), screened at dozens of festivals and received the Berlin International Film Festival’s Peace Film Award, among others.

Shifting focus to young men returning from battles in faraway lands, Bécue-Renard continues to explore war’s psychological aftermath with Of Men and War, the second volume in his trilogy, “A Genealogy of Wrath.”

Credits:

Writer/director/producer: Laurent Bécue-Renard

Cinematographer: Camille Cottagnoud

Camera operators: Camille Cottagnoud, Laurent Bécue-Renard

Editors: Isidore Bethel, Sophie Brunet, Charlotte Boigeol

Sound designer: Cyril Bécue

Running Time: 86:46

POV Series Credits:

Executive Producers: Justine Nagan, Chris White

Vice President, Content Strategy: Eliza Licht

Associate Producer: Nicole Tsien

Coordinating Producer: Nikki Heyman

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Produced by American Documentary, Inc., POV is public television’s premier showcase for nonfiction films. Since 1988, POV has been the home for the world’s boldest contemporary filmmakers, celebrating intriguing personal stories that spark conversation and inspire action. Always an innovator, POV discovers fresh new voices and creates interactive experiences that shine a light on social issues and elevate the art of storytelling. With our documentary broadcasts, original online programming and dynamic community engagement campaigns, we are committed to supporting films that capture the imagination and present diverse perspectives.

POV films have won 34 Emmy® Awards, 18 George Foster Peabody Awards, 12 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards, three Academy Awards®, the first-ever George Polk Documentary Film Award and the Prix Italia. The POV series has been honored with a Special News & Documentary Emmy Award for Excellence in Television Documentary Filmmaking, three IDA Awards for Best Curated Series and the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) Award for Corporate Commitment to Diversity. Learn more at www.pbs.org/pov/.

POV Community Engagement and Education (www.pbs.org/pov/engage/)

POV’s Community Engagement and Education team works with educators, community organizations and PBS stations to present more than 650 free screenings every year. In addition, we distribute free discussion guides and standards-aligned lesson plans for each of our films. With our community partners, we inspire dialogue around the most important social issues of our time.

POV Digital (www.pbs.org/pov/)

Since 1994, POV Digital has driven new storytelling initiatives and interactive production for POV. The department created PBS’s first program website and its first web-based documentary (POV’s Borders) and has won major awards, including a Webby Award (and six nominations) and an Online News Association Award. POV Digital continues to explore the future of independent nonfiction media through its digital productions and the POV Hackathon lab, where media makers and technologists collaborate to reinvent storytelling forms. @povdocs on Twitter.

American Documentary, Inc. (www.amdoc.org/)

American Documentary, Inc. (AmDoc) is a multimedia company dedicated to creating, identifying and presenting contemporary stories that express opinions and perspectives rarely featured in mainstream media outlets. AmDoc is a catalyst for public culture, developing collaborative strategic engagement activities around socially relevant content on television, online and in community settings. These activities are designed to trigger action, from dialogue and feedback to educational opportunities and community participation.

Major funding for POV is provided by PBS, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Corporation for Public Broadcasting and National Endowment for the Arts. Additional funding comes from Nancy Blachman and David desJardins, Bertha Foundation, Wyncote Foundation, The Fledgling Fund, Marguerite Casey Foundation, Ettinger Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, Ann Tenenbaum and Thomas H. Lee, and public television viewers. POV is presented by a consortium of public television stations, including KQED San Francisco, WGBH Boston and THIRTEEN in association with WNET.ORG.

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POV Pressroom
Produced by American Documentary, Inc., POV is public television’s premier showcase for nonfiction films. Since 1988, POV has been the home for the world’s boldest contemporary filmmakers, celebrating intriguing personal stories that spark conversation and inspire action. Always an innovator, POV discovers fresh new voices and creates interactive experiences that shine a light on social issues and elevate the art of storytelling. With our documentary broadcasts, original online programming and dynamic community engagement campaigns, we are committed to supporting films that capture the imagination and present diverse perspectives.