Extras

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: The Sound of Wisconsin

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: The Sound of Wisconsin

Jim Kirchstein’s music recording studio captured the sound of Wisconsin in the 1960s.

Sauk Prairie: The Sound of Wisconsin

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: A New Chapter

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: A New Chapter

The closing of Badger Army Ammunition led to plans for future uses of Sauk Prairie lands.

Sauk Prairie: A New Chapter

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: Glass Plates

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: Glass Plates

Glass plate negatives provide a window into the lives of past residents of the area.

Sauk Prairie: Glass Plates

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: Arsenal of Democracy

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: Arsenal of Democracy

During World War II a large ammunition plant was built on the Sauk Prairie.

Sauk Prairie: Arsenal of Democracy

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: A Writer of Place

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: A Writer of Place

August Derleth wrote about the people and places of Sauk Prairie.

Sauk Prairie: A Writer of Place

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: The Freethinkers

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: The Freethinkers

Political and religious refugees established a Free-thinking Congregation in Sauk City.

Sauk Prairie: The Freethinkers

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: Hydro-Mania

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: Hydro-Mania

The Prairie du Sac dam was a massive building project, and is still in use today.

Sauk Prairie: Hydro-Mania

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Sauk Prairie: Early History

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Sauk Prairie: Early History

The Sauk Prairie area was first inhabited by the Sauk, long before European settlement.

Sauk Prairie: Early History

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Claire: The First Eau Claire

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Claire: The First Eau Claire

The Ojibwe and Sioux found the Eau Claire-area rich in resources.

Eau Claire: The First Eau Claire

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Claire: Old Abe

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Claire: Old Abe

Old Abe, a bald eagle, became the mascot during the Civil War before retiring.

Eau Claire: Old Abe

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Claire: The Second Eau Claire

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Claire: The Second Eau Claire

New industries took hold in Eau Claire, including the Gillette Tire Company.

Eau Claire: The Second Eau Claire

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Claire: Flying Eagles

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Claire: Flying Eagles

Norwegian immigrants brought ski jumping to Eau Claire in the 1880s.

Eau Claire: Flying Eagles

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Claire: Improvisation

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Claire: Improvisation

The revival of the local arts led to Eau Claire drawing attention as an arts destination.

Eau Claire: Improvisation

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Eau Clarie: Breaking Barriers

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Eau Clarie: Breaking Barriers

Henry Aaron played for the minor league team the Eau Claire Bears.

Eau Clarie: Breaking Barriers

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Wisconsin Hometown Stories: Neenah-Menasha Preview

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Wisconsin Hometown Stories: Neenah-Menasha Preview

Film, archival images, and interviews illustrate the rich history of two Wisconsin cities.

Wisconsin Hometown Stories: Neenah-Menasha Preview

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Rivalry

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Rivalry

Competition between land speculators led to the founding of two separate settlements.

Neenah-Menasha: Rivalry

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Wood and Wheat

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Wood and Wheat

Pioneer industries, powered by the Fox River, expand in both cities.

Neenah-Menasha: Wood and Wheat

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Better Than Cotton

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Better Than Cotton

Wartime research fuels Kimberly-Clark Corp.'s invention of two ground-breaking products.

Neenah-Menasha: Better Than Cotton

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Paper

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Paper

Papermaking becomes profitable in Neenah, and expands throughout the Fox River Valley.

Neenah-Menasha: Paper

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Retooling

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Retooling

As industries faced tough competition, both cities found ways to reinvent themselves.

Neenah-Menasha: Retooling

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Building Communities

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Building Communities

Industrial wealth is channeled into solving the pressing problems of the day.

Neenah-Menasha: Building Communities

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Neenah-Menasha: Makers

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Neenah-Menasha: Makers

Locally-owned industries make a wide variety of products, and provided thousands of jobs.

Neenah-Menasha: Makers

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Oshkosh: Naming the City

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Oshkosh: Naming the City

Oshkosh was named & founded around the wetlands, rivers and lakes of the Fox River Valley.

Oshkosh: Naming the City

Video thumbnail: Wisconsin Hometown Stories Oshkosh: Sawdust City

Wisconsin Hometown Stories

Oshkosh: Sawdust City

Situated between the Fox and Wolf rivers, Oshkosh was an ideal city for lumber mills.

Oshkosh: Sawdust City

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