SEGMENT

Twenty-two seats in the dock

Like command responsibility, other conceptions of justice rapidly conceived by the Allies in the aftermath of WW2 would prove enduring. The most influential: The International Military Tribunal, created by the Allied powers in the ruins of Nuremberg, Germany to address the crimes of the Nazi State.

AIRED: 3/28/2017 | 00:03:02
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Like command responsibility, other conceptions of justice rapidly conceived by the Allies in the aftermath of WW2 would prove enduring. The most influential: The International Military Tribunal, created by the Allied powers in the ruins of Nuremberg, Germany to address the crimes of the Nazi State.

The surviving leaders of that state were charged with crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity. These charges were unprecedented. The defendants pleaded not guilty.

Among the military investigators compiling the evidence against them was Benjamin Ferencz.

Nineteen defendants were convicted. Seven received prison sentences ranging from 10 years to life. Twelve were sentenced to death. But the tribunal did not solve a larger problem. Allied investigators had published a registry of Nazi war criminals and collaborators. The first edition contained over sixty thousand names.

Coming March 28 to PBS. Check your local PBS station for air dates.