climate change

7 Stories to Read for Climate Week
7 Stories to Read for Climate Week

Earlier this week, the United Nations’ Climate Action Summit gathered in New York City to discuss their plans to dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions. This meeting kicked off Climate Week and in that spirit, we've rounded up the following nature-focused articles and events that delve into issues of climate change. Read on to discover some of the ways scientists are trying to save ecosystems and biodiversity, how art can impact climate awareness, and how you can get involved.

The Current State of Coral Reefs
The Current State of Coral Reefs

Coral reefs cover less than 1 percent of the Earth’s surface yet feed and shelter a significant amount of marine life, including some 4,000 species of fish. However, these vital ecosystems face an increasingly bleak future.

How to Give Frogs and Toads a Leg Up
How to Give Frogs and Toads a Leg Up

Founded in 1998, FrogWatch USA is one of the longest-running citizen science programs around, and, since amphibians are extremely sensitive to environmental changes, FrogWatchers’ observations have been especially valuable.

 Episode 3: Connections Preview

American Spring LIVE: Episode 3 - Connections

Episode 3: Connections Preview

Learn how plants and animals depend on each other to survive. See first-hand how climate change can break those connections, altering the timing of weather and plant growth, and disrupting the delicate relationships between plants and pollinators such as moths, bees and butterflies.

Rainy Springs Bring Disaster for Nesting Tree Swallows

American Spring LIVE: Episode 1 - Birth and Rebirth

Rainy Springs Bring Disaster for Nesting Tree Swallows

Concern about how climate change affects food security usually focuses on agriculture in resource-poor countries. But disruptions to weather patterns threaten food supplies for wildlife too.

Will Climate Change Drive a New Species of Crossbill to Extinction?
Will Climate Change Drive a New Species of Crossbill to Extinction?

Most songbirds head south for the winter, as food supplies disappear, returning to breed in the spring, when booming insect populations can satisfy clamoring broods. Not crossbills. This colorful finch, which inhabits coniferous forests around the world, breeds most anytime thanks to a highly specialized beak that can extract seeds from pine cones throughout the year. But, for a newly discovered crossbill species, this custom-made tool may prove useless if climate change claims its favorite food.