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Investors have many reasons why CDFIs are good investments. Investments in CDFIs are social investments. They are not contributions. Unlike some investments, you can see the results.

It's a social investment.
Often people invest in CDFIs because they share the social goals of a particular CDFI. For example, they may be especially interested in low-income housing, land trusts, or in creating jobs for people coming off welfare.



"When I think of my grandkids, what I could do best for them is begin to think of what America will be like in another twenty, thirty years. I can't change the society, but at least I can address the relevant issues, right?"

Hal Taussig, Individual investor

 

"It's wonderful because you aren't giving the money away. You're investing the money. You are taking a less of a rate of interest than you could normally get outside, but the Fund itself in 12 years has never had a default on a loan. That's something you can't say about most banks."

Rev. James Trimble, Christ Church

 

  It's an investment, not a contribution.
CDFIs repay the money invested in them. Credit unions and banks have deposit insurance, and even uninsured loan funds have excellent repayment records. Usually, people who invest in CDFIs are willing to accept a lower rate of interest than they could get in a money market fund.

You can see the results.
Many people like to invest in CDFIs that operate in or near their communities, so they can visit projects that their investment helped finance.

"When you actually go out and visit a site, you see homes being built. You see a laundromat functioning in a poor area. You see, concretely, the evidence of what your money is doing. Then people become very excited about it."

Sister Marie Lucy, Sisters of Saint Francis