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Egypt's Golden Empire
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Episode 1
 
Hatshepsut
The Warrior Pharaohs

In 1560 BC, Egypt was divided into two. Its very existence was threatened from both north and south. But one family was determined to restore Egypt to its former glory.

One by one, the King of Thebes and his two sons, Kamose and Ahmose, fought the Hyksos, who occupied northern Egypt. Both the King and Kamose died trying.

Ahmose was more successful, driving the Hyksos out of the north before attacking the Nubians to the south. By the time he died, he had united Egypt and created the beginnings of a new empire.

In 1479 BC, around 50 years after Ahmose's death, Egypt was again in turmoil. Against all Egyptian traditions and beliefs, the pharaoh was a woman. Hatshepsut was stepmother to the rightful king, Tuthmosis III, but had stolen his throne and was ruling in his place.

Hatshepsut needed to use all her cunning to secure her position. She used images on temple walls to claim that her father had publicly appointed her as pharaoh. Later on, she sent the army - now led by Tuthmosis III - on a trade expedition to Punt, the first in over 500 years.

The success of the mission and the exotic riches it brought back to Egypt cemented her reputation. Her throne was safe.

After waiting more than 20 years, Tuthmosis III finally gained the throne. He was keen to expand Egypt's borders and build an empire.

A daring victory at Megiddo brought him fame and enormous riches. These were increased greatly by control of the Nubian gold mines. By the end of his reign, Egypt controlled a vast empire of enormous wealth.


Where to next:

Episode 2: Pharaohs of the Sun
Episode 1: Transcript


 
 
Related Links:

Episode 2   Episode 2
Transcript 1   Transcript 1
The Series

-Episode 1
-Episode 2
-Episode 3

-Transcript 1
-Transcript 2
-Transcript 3

-Director's Diary
-Series Contributors
-Credits


Egypt's Golden Empire