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"THE FIRST MEASURED CENTURY: 
An Illustrated Guide to Trends in America, 1900–2000"

Book Credits

Authors

Theodore Caplow
Louis Hicks
Ben J. Wattenberg

Sponsor

The William H. Donner Foundation

Credits

This book was edited by Juyne Linger of the AEI Press.

Kenneth Krattenmaker of the AEI Press designed the book and set the type.

Nancy Rosenberg prepared the index.

The text was set in Berkeley and Helvetica Condensed.

Fontana Lithograph, Inc., of Cheverly, Maryland, printed and bound the book, using permanent acid-free paper.

Publisher

The AEI Press is the publisher for the American Enterprise Institute for Pulic Policy Research, 1150 Seventeenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036;
Christopher Demuth, publisher;
Montgomery Brown, director;
Juyne Linger, editor;
Ann Petty, editor;
Leigh Tripoli, editor;
Kenneth Krattenmaker, art director;
Mark Fisher, senior typesetter; and
Jennifer Morretta, production editor.
The AEI web site is located at www.aei.org. 

Special Thanks (from the Preface)

A special feature of this book is the inclusion of the first published results from “Middletown IV.” In 1929, Robert and Helen Lynd published the groundbreaking Middletown: A Study in Cultural Change based on their research during the 1920s in Muncie, Indiana. In 1978, Theodore Caplow led a team of social scientists that replicated and extended the Lynds’ original work. In 1999, The First Measured Century Project commissioned partial replications of the Middletown study to provide long-term data on certain topics not covered by official statistics. The research team, directed again by Theodore Caplow, used the same survey instruments in the same place with the same wording as the Lynds used seventy-five years earlier. For many of the topics in these surveys, these data are the longest time series existing in the world. More extensive findings from Middletown IV will be published in journal articles. 

We are much indebted to Howard M. Bahr, Bruce A. Chadwick, and Vaughn R.A. Call of Brigham Young University for conducting the High School Survey and Community Survey of Middletown IV. In particular, we wish to acknowledge crucial support provided by Brigham Young University for the preliminary analysis of the survey data. 

Many other people helped in the preparation of this volume. We particularly want to acknowledge the research assistance of undergraduates at St. Mary’s College of Maryland: Michelle Adkins, Christa Childers, Megan Duffy, Katherine Maxim, Doan Nguyen, Patricia Richman, Emily Sherman, and Erika Wilson. Pauline Poirier, a recent alumna of St. Mary’s College of Maryland, worked hard in the final months of the project to pull it all together. We are also grateful for the office space, administrative support, and library resources provided by St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Terry Leonard and Rob Sloan, reference librarians at St. Mary’s College, searched energetically for obscure, but valuable, materials. We also wish to thank AEI interns Jill Abraham and Aimee Record, and University of Virginia graduate student Stephanie Lake. Ann Ramsey and Elizabeth Olson, both from New River Media, and Hans Allhoff of AEI prepared the photographs and captions. Mark Mazzetti, Douglas Anderson, Randolph Stempski, and Robert Milt of AEI helped gather information for the book. 

Many scholars read all or part of the manuscript, identifying errors and suggesting improvements. We thank them all: Karlyn Bowman, Randall Collins, Helen Daugherty, Murray Foss, Andrew Greeley, Pamela Hicks, Ronald Hicks, Marvin Kosters, Michele Lamont, Steven L. Nock, Elizabeth Osborn, Curt Raney, John Weicher, and James Q. Wilson. 

Scholars at the U.S. Census Bureau reviewed those parts of the manuscript that relied on Census Bureau data. Their careful reading led to many improvements. We are grateful to the Census Bureau and, indeed, to the federal government’s entire statistical apparatus. 

None of those acknowledged is responsible for any errors the book may contain. Those are the sole responsibility of the authors, who would be grateful to hear from discerning readers about errors of commission or omission, so that they may be addressed in future editions. 

Juyne Linger, our editor at AEI and fellow student of U.S. statistics, dramatically improved our manuscript in many ways. We are indebted to her for the careful attention she lavished on this work. We are also grateful to the publications staff at AEI—particularly Virginia Bryant, Kenneth Krattenmaker, Montgomery Brown, and Kathryn Burrows—who worked tirelessly to produce this book on a tight schedule. 

Only the most enthusiastic support of the idea for this volume by AEI management made it possible. Simply put, without the encouragement and initiative of President Christopher DeMuth and Executive Vice President David Gerson, there would be no book. 

Nor would there be one without the generous support of the William H. Donner Foundation.

   
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