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Hidden Korea Hidden Korea Hidden Korea Hidden Korea Hidden Korea Hidden Korea

Hidden Korea
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Hidden Korea
Hidden Korea
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Hidden Korea

Songgwang Temple near Sunch'on
Songgwang Temple near Sunch'on

South Korea (the Republic of Korea) is a very modern country. Travel to its capital, Seoul, and you will find a city that is as up-to-date as any in Europe, the United States, or Japan. But Korea has retained A unique identity through its own traditional culture, its language, and its wonderful cuisine. Walk through any city or town, along wide streets or small alleyways, and discover a wide variety of restaurants, both large and small. even the most unassuming place serves wonderful dishes, from fish to grilled meats, great mushrooms, and arrays of preserved foods.

Korea's markets, its fishing and farming villages, modern though the buildings might be, remain very much the same as in the past. And its artisans -- celadon pottery makers for example -- have recreated the great works of the past. All are traditional expressions of Korean culture, which is still based on certain 600 year-old Confucian principles. Among these are A willingness to work hard at any task and, most importantly, devotion to the family. These family values are best observed during their major holiday called Ch'usok. Each year, about the time of the harvest moon, Koreans memorialize their ancestors with food and prayer. Families Travel to their ancestral homes to build altars laden with food, then go to their grandparents' or parents' burial mounds where they offer food and bow in homage. It is a colorful and moving ceremony.

Korean culture is still based on certain 600 year-old Confucian principles. Among these are willingness to work hard at any task and, especially, devotion to the family. These family values are best observed during their major holiday called Ch'usok. Each year, about the time of the harvest moon, Koreans memorialize their ancestors with food and prayer. Families members travel to wherever their ancestral homes are. There they build altars laden with food and then go to their grandparents' or parents' burial mounds where they offer food and bow in homage. It is a colorful and moving ceremony. In this and many other ways the Korean peoples' basic cultural values remain vital.