The House I Live In

Trailer (2:17)
Clip ( 3:22)
Clip 2 (1:29)
Clip 3 (1:30)
Awards
  • 2012 Sundance Film Festival — Grand Jury Prize
  • 2013 George Foster Peabody Award
  • About the Film

    Dennis Whidbee, father of a prisoner, looking up to the sky on the beach.

    America’s longest war? The war on drugs. And many contend that it’s the most unsuccessful war as well. For the past 40 years, the war on drugs has resulted in more than 45 million arrests, $1 trillion in government spending, and America’s role as the world’s largest jailer. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available than ever.

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  • Take the Independent Lens Drug Test

    How much do you know about recreational drugs? We’ve created the 20-question Best Drug Test You’ll Ever Take to test your knowledge of drug trivia and drug sentencing laws. You may be surprised by some of the answers.

    Quiz me >>

  • Additional Resources

    Screen shot of House I Live in website.

    Want to find ways to get involved in your community? Every day, more people pitch in to reform America's drug policy. Visit The House I Live In website for local events, initiatives, and organizations that are working for change.

    Learn more >>

  • Filmmaker Q&A

    Filmmaker Eugene Jarecki

    We sat down with acclaimed filmmaker Eugene Jarecki to talk with him about what drove him to make his penetrating look at the profound human rights implications of America’s longest war: the War on Drugs.

    Read more on the IL Blog >>

  • Short Film Spotlight

    Close up of Chris Dean who is featured in the short film As I Am

    We talked to Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Alan Spearman about his experiences making the short film, As I Am, which is airing with The House I Live In. Both films shed light on the realities of poverty in urban environments.

    Read more on the IL Blog >>

  • Talkback

    Back of a prisoner wearing orange, peering through chain link of prison yard

    There’s a growing recognition that the drug war the U.S. has been fighting for the last four decades must change. What do you think should be changed, if anything?

    Weigh in >>