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And Then One Night - The Making of Dead Man Walking
Creative Process Stories Behind Capital Punishment Sister Helen Prejean About the Program

Classroom Content

Are you interested in having your students explore social issues through art and music? Are you looking for tools that can help you engage students on the difficult issue of capital punishment? The following distinct lessons, correlated to national standards for civics, language arts, and thinking and reasoning, can be used in conjunction with the program and/or the Web site, And Then One Night: The Making of Dead Man Walking. The first lesson "The Art of Social Protest," can also be used on its own.

- Lesson One -

Title: The Art of Social Protest
Grade Levels: 9 through 12
Subject Areas: Civics, Language Arts
Time: Five 50-minute class periods (This may vary depending on how much work is done outside the classroom).

Overview: The purpose of this activity is for students to examine how art and music help define and unify a social movement and also how they can function as symbols of protest. Various historical examples will be used to illustrate the impact of art and music on social protest. Students will watch the KQED program And Then One Night: The Making of Dead Man Walking and discuss what happens when art takes on a social issue. Students will look at contemporary and historical examples of art as protest, design an art-based project to communicate their thoughts and feelings on a social issue, and write an opera synopsis based on a current issue.

Download a copy of the lesson in Adobe Acrobat™ PDF format. (Get the free Acrobat Reader)

- Lesson Two -

Title: You Decide Companion
Grade Levels: 9 through 12
Subject Areas: Civics, Language Arts, Thinking and Reasoning
Time: Three 50-minute class periods

Overview: These activities are to be used in conjunction with the And then One Night: Making of Dead Man Walking Web site. Students will conduct Internet research on the topic of capital punishment, complete the You Decide Web activity, and discuss how people's views on the death penalty can be challenged by an event such as the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

Download a copy of the lesson in Adobe Acrobat™ PDF format. (Get the free Acrobat Reader)

Please note that this activity involves use of the "You Decide" feature of the Web site. Since the topic is capital punishment, and it relates to specific stories, it involves images, stories, and concepts that may be disturbing to some students.

What is PDF?
The And Then One Night lesson is available in Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF). You will need to have installed on your computer the Adobe Acrobat™ Reader program in order to view and print the lesson. You may download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat™ Reader by visiting here.


The Authors

KQED Education Network (KQED EdNet) inspires learning through innovative understanding, use and creation of media that respects diverse perspectives. KQED EdNet is committed to the exchange of ideas and resources in partnership with the community. To this end, it provides an instructional television service, curriculum materials, projects for youth and professional development for teachers, child care providers and families; organizes public forums; and sponsors local events.

Development of the teacher and parent guides was done in partnership with Maureen Carroll and Laurel Blaine, co-founders of Bay Breeze Educational Resources, LLC. Bay Breeze provides engaging K-12 technology-based curriculum that fosters the development of critical thinking skills through the use of the Internet, popular culture, and media.


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