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Legacy
The Documentary
The Collins Family
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Filmmaker Tod Lending
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The Collins Family
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Marquis (Jack)
Jack

Terrell's older brother Jack was with him when he was killed. His inability to save Terrell caused an enormous burden of guilt he continues to carry. As a result, Jack pulled away from the family. In a later interview, Jack says that he's living up to everyone's belief that he will be a nobody. Always close to trouble while growing up, he has dropped out of high school, joined a gang and fathered two children. He continues the cycle of addiction, a struggle for the family when he is out on the street. At Terrell's gravesite, we see him sobbing. Nickcole comforts and advises him, saying that Terrell "can't help us if we can't help ourselves." Jack understands the need for change. He explains, "I'm getting older, going to be 20. If I can't change, it will be a bumpy road for me. I have to change my life for me." He acknowledges that no one can help him unless he is ready to help himself.

The fifth year of filmmaking marks new milestones for the family:

Nickcole is a senior, working on a degree in early childhood development. She wants to work with preschoolers and open her own daycare center. Wanda and her children move to West Haven. She attends AA support meetings and stays clean. She is ready to be on her own. Alaissa has completed studying for the GED and is on her way to getting her teaching certificate. She continues to teach kindergarten at St. Malachy. Henry Horner Homes are being demolished, and new town homes are replacing them. The documentary ends with the celebration of Nickcole's marriage to Johnny Pierre. They will wait to have children until they finish school. Nickcole comments that the family's story always comes back to Terrell-that he showed them how precious life is and motivated them to believe in themselves. The older generation of Collins women overcame their sense of hopelessness and built a better future for themselves and their children. Over video clips of Terrell, Nickcole tells us: "Terrell is always with us and his LEGACY will live on. May he rest in peace."

LEGACY is a story about a family finding the strength and courage to transform their lives. No longer dependent on fate, but rather motivated by their own spirit of self-determination, they are able to utilize key support structures. LEGACY brings humanity to some of our nation's most pressing challenges, leaving viewers with a more realistic understanding of poverty, drugs and violence in urban America. Extending the impact of the documentary, the National LEGACY Outreach Campaign will advance the public's understanding of the complex issues of families in poverty and distressed neighborhoods, and encourage a more thoughtful response that will lead to reality-based solutions and stronger support structures.

Violent death creates tremendous need for family grief counseling, in general, and for Jack, in particular. Terrell's older brother continues the cycle of addiction, a struggle for the family when he is out on the street. Jack was with Terrell when he was killed; and his inability to save him has caused an enormous burden of guilt. Always close to trouble while growing up, he has dropped out of high school, joined a gang and fathered two children. At 20, Jack understands the need for change and acknowledges that no one can help him unless he is ready to help himself. Jack could benefit from a positive role model, such as Kenny Butler, Nickcole's mentor at the Boys & Girls Club.

Video Update Alaissa Wanda Nickcole Dorothy