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Mark Twain
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The Gilded Age 1869-1871
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Love and Love Letters
 
 

“I first saw her in the form of an ivory miniature in her brother’s stateroom in the steamer Quaker City in the Bay of Smryna, in the summer of 1867, when she was in her twenty-second year. I saw her in the flesh for the first time in New York in the following December. She was slender and beautiful and girlish—and she was both girl and woman. She remained both girl and woman to the last day of her life. Under a grave and gentle exterior burned inextinguishable fires of sympathy, energy, devotion, enthusiasm and absolutely limitless affection. She was always frail in body and she lived upon her spirit, whose hopefulness and courage were indestructible.”—Mark Twain, Autobiography, posthumous

 
 
What, sir, would the people of the earth be without woman? They would be scarce, sir, almighty scarce. Mark Twain, speech, Women - an opinion, 1868.
Letter to Olivia, January, 1870
Letter to Olivia, January, 1870
Courtesy of The Mark Twain Project,
Bancroft Library, Berkeley
Audio Real Audio: 56k
“The Best Girl in all the World”
Video E-Postcard:  
Mark Twain on a cigar box
 

With brother Charles Clemens, 1868
With brother Charles Clemens, 1868
Courtesy of The Mark Twain Project,
Bancroft Library, Berkeley
Olivia Clemens, 1867
Olivia Clemens, 1867
Courtesy of The Mark Twain Museum, Hannibal
 
 
My Dear dear dear dear dear dear dear Livy - that is the tamest word that ever I saw - you have to repeat it 6 or 7 times to make it express anything. Mark Twain, Letter to Olivia Langdon, 1869.  
 
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