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The Church and State Debate
The debate over the Separation of Church and State stretches far beyond the political arena: into our nation's hospitals, our bedrooms, our scientific research facilities, which is what makes a basic understanding of the underlying facts of debate important.

How well do you know the history of God and government in the United States? Learn about it below.

THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION (1788)

The Constitution was totally silent on the subject of religion. The Framers established no national church; delegates of the Constitutional Convention believed that religion was a matter best left to the states. The only mention of religion in the Constitution was that there should be no "religious test" required by any federal officeholders and that one could "affirm" rather than "swear" in taking the oath of office.

Thomas Jefferson was in Paris at the time the Constitution was being drafted. James Madison, who was a strong proponent of leaving religion up to the states, sent him a copy. Jefferson was unhappy with the omission of some form of bill of rights "providing clearly and without the aid of sophisms for the freedom of religion."


BILL OF RIGHTS (1791)

The First Amendment states, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."

Two things were guaranteed: that Congress will not favor, promote, or endow religion; and that Congress shall not impede, obstruct or penalize religion. Government would simply leave religion alone. However, the language in the Bill of Rights was still vague and open to interpretation.


THOMAS JEFFERSON'S PRESIDENCY

Unlike his predecessors Presidents Washington and Adams, Thomas Jefferson opposed Presidential proclamations for prayer, fasting and thanksgiving. Well-known for his unorthodox religious opinions as well as for his liberal views on religious liberty and the separation of church and state, Jefferson was the writer of Virginia's Statute for Religious Freedom, which ended all practice of state-supported religion in Virginia when it was enacted into law in 1786.

Jefferson was the one who coined the phrase "wall of separation between Church and State" in a letter he wrote to the Danbury Baptist Association in 1802, in which he described his understanding of the meaning of the religious clauses of the First Amendment.

Learn more about the debate that surrounds Jefferson's letter from the NOW with BILL MOYERS website.


EVERSON V. BOARD OF EDUCATION (1947)

The Supreme Court unanimously affirmed the separation of church and state and used Jefferson's letter for the court opinion. Justice Black said, "That wall must be kept high and impregnable." Most of the Supreme Court's church-state decisions handed down since this case have been grounded in the Everson standard.

Posted May 11, 2007

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