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Silent Epidemic

Dealing with Depression
Living with a Depressed Person
What to Do
Helpful Resources
Risk FactorsGetting HelpResourcesThe Program

Getting Help
Understanding
courtesy of the American Association of Suicidology

Many people at some time in their lives think about committing suicide. Most decide to live, because they eventually come to realize that the crisis is temporary and death is permanent.

However, people having a crisis sometimes perceive their dilemma as inescapable and feel an utter loss of control. These are some of the feelings and things they experience:

  • Can't stop the pain
  • Can't think clearly
  • Can't make decisions
  • Can't see any way out
  • Can't sleep, eat or work
  • Can't get out of depression
  • Can't make the sadness go away
  • Can't see a future without pain
  • Can't see themselves as worthwhile
  • Can't get someone's attention
  • Can't seem to get control
If you suspect someone close to you is thinking about suicide, it is vitally important that you seek outside professional help. In many cities there are mental health organizations that offer services for little or no fee. You may call The Covenant House Nineline 1-800-999-9999.

If you are experiencing these feelings, get help NOW. There is someone who cares!

Contact:

  • A community mental health agency
  • A private therapist or counselor
  • A school counselor or psychologist
  • A family physician
  • A suicide prevention or crisis center
  • The Covenant House Nineline at 1-800-999-9999

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